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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Modena in Ulster County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Newburgh Area

Historic New York

 
 
Newburgh Area Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 21, 2012
1. Newburgh Area Marker
Inscription. Palatine German refugees from the religious wars of Europe settled on these river banks in 1709, and Dutch and French Huguenots followed. During the Revolution, control of the Hudson River was important for British strategy and for American defense. To block British advance up the river in May 1778, an iron chain with two-foot links forged at nearby Sterling Iron Works, was stretched across from West Point to Constitution Island. On July 16, 1779, General Anthony Wayne stormed and captured Stony Point. West Point was fortified and garrisoned. Its betrayal by Benedict Arnold in 1780 was thwarted by the capture of his British collaborator, Major John Andre. General Washington’s headquarters were at Newburgh, 1782-83. General Henry Knox’s headquarters were at Vail’s Gate, and the last cantonment of the Continental Army was at Temple Hill.

River traffic first by sloop and then by steamboat brought increased population and commerce. Small factories sprang up and Newburgh as a thriving port in the nineteenth century was linked to the interior by turnpikes and later by railroads. Fruit growing flourished in the highlands.

The Catskill Mountains attract tourists and provide vacation resorts. Goshen, site of the original Hambletonian event, is famous for trotting horse races.
 
Erected 1965
Newburgh Area Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 22, 2011
2. Newburgh Area Marker
by Education Department – State of New York – N.Y.S. Thruway Authority.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Historic New York marker series.
 
Location. 41° 35.551′ N, 74° 5.298′ W. Marker is in Modena, New York, in Ulster County. Marker can be reached from New York Thruway (Interstate 87 at milepost 66), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at the Modena Travel Plaza I-87 NYS Thruway - Southbound between Exit 18 (New Paultz) and Exit 17 (Newburgh) at Milepost 66, on the north side of the Service Area building. . Marker is in this post office area: Modena NY 12548, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Washington’s Headquarters (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Newburgh Area (approx. one mile away); a different marker also named Washington’s Headquarters (approx. 1.1 miles away); Thomas Machin’s Mint (approx. 3.6 miles away); Gidney Grist Mill (approx. 5.4 miles away); Gomez Mill House (approx. 5.5 miles away); The Balmville Tree (approx. 5.7 miles away); Riverside Farm (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Historic New York Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 21, 2012
3. Historic New York Marker
Newburgh Area Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 21, 2012
4. Newburgh Area Marker
Modena Travel Plaza image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
5. Modena Travel Plaza
Newburg Area marker is located at the Modena Travel Plaza on the New York Thruway.
Modena Travel Plaza,<br>Newburgh Area Marker at Right image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 22, 2011
6. Modena Travel Plaza,
Newburgh Area Marker at Right
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 595 times since then. Last updated on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   6. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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