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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Danvers in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Samuel Parris Archaeological Site

 
 
Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 13, 2010
1. Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker
Inscription.
Samuel Parris
Archaeological Site
1681-1784

 
Location. 42° 33.94′ N, 70° 57.749′ W. Marker is in Danvers, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker is on Centre Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located behind the fire hydrant off the side of the road. Marker is in this post office area: Danvers MA 01923, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Salem Village Parsonage (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage (about 300 feet away); The 1734 Addition (about 300 feet away); The Church in Salem Village (about 600 feet away); Deacon Nathaniel Ingersoll (about 700 feet away); Village Training Field (approx. 0.2 miles away); Salem Village Meeting House (approx. ¼ mile away); Salem Village Witchcraft Victims’ Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Danvers.
 
More about this marker. Marker is usually partly obscured by trees/bushes.
(Care in parking is advised. There are no places to park at this location. An idea is to park at the Salem Village Church and walk to this site.)
 
Regarding Samuel Parris Archaeological Site.
Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 13, 2010
2. Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker
Street perspective.
(From Wikipedia)
Samuel Parris (1653 – February 27, 1720) was the Puritan minister in Salem Village, Massachusetts during the Salem witch trials, as well as the father to one of the afflicted girls, and uncle of another.

[...]

The events that led to the Salem witch trials began when his daughter, Betty Parris, and her cousin Abigail Williams accused the family's slave Tituba of witchcraft. In February 1692, Betty Parris began having "fits" that the doctor could not explain. Parris beat Tituba and compelled her to confess that she was a witch. The hysteria lasted sixteen months, concluding with the Salem witch trials.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Samuel Parris. Wikipedia article on Samuel Parris. Includes a photo. (Submitted on October 13, 2010, by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts.) 
 
Additional keywords. Witch, Witch Trial, Salem Witch Trial
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, October 13, 2010
3. Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker
Additional street perspective.
Walkway to Archaeological Site. image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, November 27, 2010
4. Walkway to Archaeological Site.
More of the approach to the site. image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, November 27, 2010
5. More of the approach to the site.
Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, December 3, 2010
6. Samuel Parris Archaeological Site Marker
View of the approach to the actual Parsonage (See next HMDB Entry "Salem Village Parsonage - 1681" #38525)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,909 times since then and 16 times this year. Last updated on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts.   4, 5. submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts.   6. submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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