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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Danvers in Essex County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage

 
 
The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, November 27, 2010
1. The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage Marker
Inscription. {Not all of the text on this marker can be transcribed.}

In February, 1681, the Salem village inhabitants voted, "We will build a house for the Ministry and provid convenient Land for that end. The Dementions of the House are as followeth: 42 foot long; twenty foot Broad; thirteen foot stude: Fouer chimleis no gable ends."

The house faced south and included a half-cellar on its west side which was composed of dry laid fieldstones, and which was entered by means of a stairway from the porch (front entry). The east side of the house did not include a cellar, the house sills resting on ground stones. The first floor consisted of two rooms separated by the front entry and a massive brick chimney structure. Two bed chambers were located on the second floor. Each of the house's four rooms included a fireplace. By 1692 a "saltbox" leanto was attached to the rear of the house, and used as a kitchen.

Rev. George Burroughs first lived in this house followed by Rev. Deodat Lawson. In 1689 Rev. Samuel Parris, his wife Elizabeth, daughter Elizabeth, and nice Abigail Williams came to live here.
...

The witch hysteria and subsequent legal proceedings resulted in the imprisonment of over 150 persons and the deaths of 23, including former Parsonage resident George Burroughs.

Continued
The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, December 3, 2010
2. The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage Marker
to be occupied by the Salem Village and Danvers ministers, the 1681 parsonage was finally torn down in 1784, and the land reverted to a pasture.
...

By 1970 the property was owned by Alfred and Edie Anne Hutchinson, who were approached by history student Richard B Trask with a proposal to find and excavate the site. The resulting "Danvers Dig" was accomplished through the efforts of numerous volunteers assisted by archaeologist Roland Wells Robbins. In 1988, with state assistance, the Town of Danvers purchased the site as an historic landmark.
 
Location. 42° 33.981′ N, 70° 57.719′ W. Marker is in Danvers, Massachusetts, in Essex County. Marker can be reached from Centre Street. Click for map. This marker is attached to the larger of the two cellars in the excavation. (Right hand side.) Marker is between Prince and Hobart Streets. Marker is in this post office area: Danvers MA 01923, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The 1734 Addition (here, next to this marker); Salem Village Parsonage (here, next to this marker); Samuel Parris Archaeological Site (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Church in Salem Village (about 700 feet
The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage image. Click for full size.
By Michael Tiernan, December 3, 2010
3. The 1681 Salem Village Parsonage
away); Deacon Nathaniel Ingersoll (about 700 feet away); Village Training Field (approx. 0.2 miles away); Salem Village Meeting House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Salem Village Witchcraft Victims’ Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Danvers.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Additional keywords. Witch, Witch Trial, Salem Witch Trial
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,363 times since then and 28 times this year. Last updated on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts.   2, 3. submitted on , by Michael Tiernan of Danvers, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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