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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
Savannah Waterfront
 
Savannah Waterfront Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, January 2008
1. Savannah Waterfront Marker
 
Inscription. The colony of Georgia began on Savannah's waterfront in 1733. The riverfront has always played an important role in Georgia, whether as a colonial port, exporter of cotton, or tourist destination. The first commercial house below the bluff opened in 1744. Cotton dominated Savannah's exports throughout the nineteenth century. Construction began in early 1800s for the multi-storied warehouses and "Factor's Walk," named for the cotton brokes whose offices were in the upper floors. River Street, was created in 1834 and cobbled with ballast stones. The last cotton office on the waterfront was closed in 1956. River Street's revitalization began in 1977.
 
Erected 2001 by The Georgia Historical Society and the Savannah Waterfront Association. (Marker Number 25-7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.898′ N, 81° 5.462′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on River Street near Bull Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at Visitor's Center behind Savannah's City Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 W River St, Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are
 
Savannah Waterfront Marker along River Street, opposite the Visitors Center Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, September 11, 2011
2. Savannah Waterfront Marker along River Street, opposite the Visitors Center
 
within walking distance of this marker. African American Monument (here, next to this marker); Savannah and the Slave Trade (a few steps from this marker); Jewish Colonists (within shouting distance of this marker); Savannah in the American Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); Landing of Oglethorpe and the Colonists (within shouting distance of this marker); This is Yamacraw Bluff (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Oglethorpe's Landing (within shouting distance of this marker); Savannah City Hall (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Regarding Savannah Waterfront. Riverfront Plaza and "Factor's Walk", River Street's restored nineteenth-century cotton warehouses and passageways, include shops, pubs and restaurants, amoung other businesses today.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Savannah, Georgia. Savannah's historic district has 24 squares. The squares vary in size and personality, from the formal fountain and monuments of the largest, Johnson, to the playgrounds of the smallest, Crawford. Elbert, Ellis, and Liberty Squares are classified as the "lost squares," destroyed due to development in the 1950s. Elbert and Liberty Squares were paved over to make way for a realignment of US 17, while Ellis Square was demolished to build the City Market parking garage. Separate efforts are under way to revive each of the three lost squares. The city has recently razed the City Market parking garage in order to build a new parking facility underground, with a new park on the street level. (Submitted on January 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Savannah Waterfront Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
3. Savannah Waterfront Marker
 

2. "The River Street Rambler, ". a Central of Georgia switching engine, has become a tourist attraction (Submitted on January 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. “Tall Ships Challenge 2012, Atlantic Coast”
May 2012 when Savannah becomes a stop for tall sailing ships racing along the Atlantic coast. Up to 15 tall ships will dock in Savannah May 3-7, 2012, as part of the “Tall Ships Challenge 2012, Atlantic Coast” race
    — Submitted May 4, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
 
Waterfront with Paddlewheeler Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, October 2003
4. Waterfront with Paddlewheeler
City Hall, with the Gold Dome roof, is to the right.
 
 
Savannah Waterfront image, Click for more information
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
5. Savannah Waterfront
Landing of Oglethorpe
Click for more information.
 
 
Factors Walk Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, January 2008
6. Factors Walk
The men who worked with the cotton exchange were called factors; they factored how much cotton was brought in to be sold. Thus, this area was given the name, Factors Walk. Factors Walk, the center for most commercial activities in the area, is a network of iron and concrete walkways connecting the buildings to the bluff.
 
 
Factors Walk Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, January 2008
7. Factors Walk
 
 
Factors Walk Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, January 2008
8. Factors Walk
 
 
Factors Walk Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, January 2008
9. Factors Walk
 
 
The Cotton Exchange Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, May 2005
10. The Cotton Exchange
 
 
River Street Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, May 2005
11. River Street
Shops, pubs and restaurants...
 
 
Savannah's Waving Girl, Florance Martus... statue by Felex DeWeldon. image, Click for more information
By Michael Stroud, July 1994
12. Savannah's Waving Girl, Florance Martus... statue by Felex DeWeldon.
Florence Martus (1868 – 1943), also known as The Waving Girl, took it upon herself to be the unofficial greeter of all ships that entered and left the Port of Savannah. Using handkerchief by day and lanterns by night, not a ship was missed in her 44 years on watch. A statue of Martus has been erected in Morrell Park on the riverfront in Savannah, Georgia. On September 27, 1943 a Liberty ship was christened in her honor, the SS Florence Martus. (Wikipedia)
Click for more information.
 
 
Trains once traveled River Street, but no longer Photo, Click for full size
By Michael Stroud, July 1994
13. Trains once traveled River Street, but no longer
The River Street Rambler - this locomotive was so much trouble that NS removed it from Savannah as of 2003
 
 
Savannah Waterfront , Tall Ships 2012 Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 3, 2012
14. Savannah Waterfront , Tall Ships 2012
 
 
Savannah Waterfront, Tall Ships 2012, French Schooner "La Belle Poule" hanging a pennant Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 3, 2012
15. Savannah Waterfront, Tall Ships 2012, French Schooner "La Belle Poule" hanging a pennant
 
 
Savannah Waterfront, Indonesia's "Dewaruci" ... tall Ships 2012 Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 3, 2012
16. Savannah Waterfront, Indonesia's "Dewaruci" ... tall Ships 2012
She is used as a sail training vessel for naval cadets and is the largest tall ship in the Indonesian fleet. The Dewaruci also serves as a goodwill ambassador for the country of Indonesia to the rest of the world.
 
 
Savannah Waterfront Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 5, 2012
17. Savannah Waterfront
 
 
Old Retaining Wall Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
18. Old Retaining Wall
 
 
River Street Shops Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
19. River Street Shops
 
 
River Street Shops Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
20. River Street Shops
 
 
Riverboat Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
21. Riverboat
 
 
Riverboat Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
22. Riverboat
 
 
Savannah River Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
23. Savannah River Bridge
 
 
Savannah River Bridge Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
24. Savannah River Bridge
 
 
Waterfront Fountain Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
25. Waterfront Fountain
 
 
Savannah Waterfront Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 24, 2009
26. Savannah Waterfront
The Port of Savannah was the second busiest U.S. container port for the export of American goods by tonnage in FY2011. It also handled 8.7 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 12.5 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2011.
 
 
Savannah Waterfront, working tugs Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 24, 2009
27. Savannah Waterfront, working tugs
 
 
Savannah Waterfront, container ship heading to port, with ferry boat Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
28. Savannah Waterfront, container ship heading to port, with ferry boat
The distribution sector of Savannah's economy is booming. Fueled by the Port of Savannah, the world's largest distributors are clamoring to get a piece of the action.
 
 
Savannah Waterfront, tugboat Gen.Oglethorpe working the Savannah River Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
29. Savannah Waterfront, tugboat Gen.Oglethorpe working the Savannah River
The Port of Savannah, operated by the Georgia Ports Authority, is the fastest growing port in the nation, the second largest on the East and Gulf Coasts, and not surprisingly, a major economic development engine for the entire state of Georgia.
 
 
Savannah Waterfront, Savannah Convention Center seen from Bay Street Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, December 9, 2008
30. Savannah Waterfront, Savannah Convention Center seen from Bay Street
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on January 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 4,019 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on February 15, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on October 6, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on January 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on October 7, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on January 22, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   14, 15, 16. submitted on May 3, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   17. submitted on May 5, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25. submitted on October 6, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   26, 27, 28, 29, 30. submitted on October 7, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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