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Camden in Kershaw County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Southern Campaign, Aug 1780 - Apr 1781

 
 
The Southern Campaign, Aug 1780 - Apr 1781 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
1. The Southern Campaign, Aug 1780 - Apr 1781 Marker
Inscription. After the American defeat at Camden in August 1780, the remnants of the Continental Army regrouped in North Carolina. Lord Cornwallis decided to follow up his victory with an invasion of that state, and advanced from Camden on September 8. The British reached Charlotte on September 26, but were forced to withdraw the following month after American militia from west of the Appalachians destroyed a Loyalist force commanded by British Major Patrick Ferguson at Kings Mountain, South Carolina, on October 7.

In December Major General Nathanael Greene assumed command of the American army in the South. Greene remained at Cheraw, South Carolina, with part of his army and sent the remainder, under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, to operate in northwestern South Carolina. Cornwallis responded by dividing his own army, sending Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton to attack Morgan. On January 17, 1781, Morgan destroyed Tarleton’s force at the Cowpens, South Carolina.

“I was desirous to have a stroke at Tarleton … & have given him a devil of a whipping.” Daniel Morgan, after the Battle of Cowpens

Cornwallis set off in pursuit of Morgan, who reunited with Greene in North Carolina. The American army eluded Cornwallis and reached safety behind the Dan River in Virginia.

Greene soon returned to North
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
2. Overview
Carolina but the British defeated him at Guilford Courthouse on March 15. Cornwallis, who had suffered heavy losses, then withdrew his exhausted army to Wilmington, North Carolina.

After following Cornwallis part of the way toward Wilmington, Greene made one of the most daring decisions of the war. He changed direction and led his army back to South Carolina. Cornwallis, after resting his soldiers, marched to Virginia to unite with the 5,000 British troops operating along Chesapeake Bay.
 
Location. 34° 14.053′ N, 80° 36.25′ W. Marker is in Camden, South Carolina, in Kershaw County. Marker can be reached from Broad Street. Click for map. Marker is located in the Historic Camden Battle Site. Marker is in this post office area: Camden SC 29020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Camden - Strategic Key (here, next to this marker); The Southern Campaign, Apr 1781 - Dec 1782 (here, next to this marker); The Southern Campaign, Dec 1778 - Aug 1780 (here, next to this marker); The Fortified Post (a few steps from this marker); Palisade Wall (a few steps from this marker); Native Allies (within shouting
Picture on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
3. Picture on the marker
Brigadier General Daniel Morgan Engraving after Chappel by Johnson, Fry & Co., 1862. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.
distance of this marker); War in the Backcountry (within shouting distance of this marker); Women in the Revolution (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Camden.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Picture on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
4. Picture on the marker
Battle of Cowpens ... Conflict between Col. Washington & Tarleton Engraved by Henry J. Johnson after Chappel, 1879. Courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina
Picture on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, October 2, 2011
5. Picture on the marker
Lee's Cavalry Skirmishing at the Battle of Guilford Engraving After Chappel by Johnson, Fry & Co., 1857, courtesy of South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 297 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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