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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Highfalls in Ulster County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Delaware and Hudson Canal

 
 
Delaware and Hudson Canal Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 17, 2007
1. Delaware and Hudson Canal Plaque
Inscription.
Delaware and Hudson Canal
has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark
Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States
U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1968

 
Erected 1968 by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 41° 49.631′ N, 74° 7.655′ W. Marker is in Highfalls, New York, in Ulster County. Marker is on Main Street near 2nd Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: High Falls NY 12440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Depuy House (here, next to this marker); Freer House (approx. 5.5 miles away); Hasbrouck House (approx. 5.5 miles away); Stone Church-1773 (approx. 5.6 miles away); Bevier House (approx. 5.6 miles away); Dubois House (approx. 5.6 miles away); New Paltz (approx. 5.6 miles away); Deyo House (approx. 5.6 miles away).
 
Regarding Delaware and Hudson Canal.
Delaware and Hudson Canal Lock 16 image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 17, 2007
2. Delaware and Hudson Canal Lock 16
Lock 16 is the first of a flight of 5 locks here at "The D&H Canal 5 Lock Walk", each with an average lift of 12'8". The five locks raised/lowered boats a total of over 63 feet. The D&H Canal plaque is on the left wall of the lock chamber.
The Delaware and Hudson Canal was built to haul anthracite coal from the Lackawanna Valley in Pennsylvania to Kingston, New York on its journey to New York City markets. When the canal was completed in 1828, and it was 108 miles in length. It utilized 108 locks to overcome the 972-foot elevation difference between the Hudson River at Kingston, New York, and its western terminus at Honesdale, Pennsylvania. Essential to the operation of the canal was a 16 mile gravity and inclined plane railroad which brought anthracite from the coal fields near Carbondale to the canal at Honesdale. By 1854 more than 1,400 boats were operating on the D & H. Growth of railroads meant decline for the canal, which closed in in 1898.
 
Also see . . .
1. The D&H Canal Historical Society. (Submitted on November 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. National Canal Museum - D&H Canal. (Submitted on November 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
3. The D&H Canal Five Lock Walk. (Submitted on November 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
4. History of the Canal System of the State of New York: Chapter 20: The Delaware and Hudson Canal. (Submitted on November 2, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Lock 16 Is To the Left of the Depuy Canal House image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 17, 2007
3. Lock 16 Is To the Left of the Depuy Canal House
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 393 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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