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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ligonier in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Road versus Rail

Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor

 
 
Road versus Rail Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 11, 2011
1. Road versus Rail Marker
Inscription.
The rise and fall of the railroad corresponded to the continuing increase of roads, like the Lincoln Highway. Railroads were needed for transportation because roads were virtually impassable. But once new paving techniques made road surfaces durable, there was a revolution in transportation. Suddenly, roads were competing with trains for regional transportation.

The Ligonier Valley Railroad or "Doodlebug" as many called it, transported over 9 million passengers during its years of existence. This chapter was acquired in 1853. The railroad line was needed to transport lumber, coal and stone products to distant markets. The 16 mile-long railway began operating in 1871. Later, more branch lines were added that extended to coal mines in this region. The most prosperous period for the railroad was during the First World War. Over the years, the trains hauled over 59 million tons of freight. The railroad closed on August 31, 1952 after 81 active years because traffic on roads had become more important than traffic on rails. Tickets were sold for the "last run" of the railroad so passengers could enjoy one more ride.
 
Erected by Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lincoln Highway marker series.
 
Location.
Ligonier Valley Railroad Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 11, 2011
2. Ligonier Valley Railroad Markers
40° 14.781′ N, 79° 14.595′ W. Marker is in Ligonier, Pennsylvania, in Westmoreland County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Walnut Street, on the left when traveling west on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 339 West Main Street, Ligonier PA 15658, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ligonier Depot (here, next to this marker); Roadside Enterprise (approx. mile away); Highway Enterprise (approx. 0.3 miles away); Ligonier War Memorial (approx. 0.3 miles away); Ligonier Town Square Fountain (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fort Ligonier (approx. 0.4 miles away); Desert Storm Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Building the Highway (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Ligonier.
 
Also see . . .
1. Brief History of the Ligonier Valley Railroad. (Submitted on November 6, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. The Lincoln Highway: An Introduction. (Submitted on November 6, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor. (Submitted on November 6, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
Last Run Ticket on Road versus Rail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ligonier Valley Railroad, August 31, 1952
3. Last Run Ticket on Road versus Rail Marker
Courtesy of Ligonier Valley Historical Society.
Last Run Ticket on Road versus Rail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ligonier Valley Railroad, August 31, 1952
4. Last Run Ticket on Road versus Rail Marker
Courtesy of Ligonier Valley Historical Society
Photo on Road versus Rail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, August 31, 1952
5. Photo on Road versus Rail Marker
[Caption reads] The last run of the Ligonier Valley Railroad on August 31, 1952. Featured are Tucker Frye, Dave Albert, Russ Lowden, Lester Turner, and an unidentified child.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 458 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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