Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Henrico in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Farthest Advance

 
 
The Farthest Advance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 5, 2011
1. The Farthest Advance Marker
Inscription. Two small structures used as slave quarters stood in this clearing. Some of the fiercest fighting raged around them in the twilight, as men of Paul J. Semmes’ Confederate brigade used the buildings for shelter and exchanged short-range fire with counterattacking Union troops. It is unlikely that any organized Confederate formation advanced beyond these cabins; none reached the roaring line of cannon at the hill’s crest. When July 2 dawned, a line of Southern casualties stretched across the hill, showing the high-water mark of the Confederate advance.

“When I had ridden up to about Crewe’s [slave] cabins, I turned and looked backward, and saw the awful sight as a whole....The long line of dead extended towards our right until lost in the woods and the sloping ravines towards the river, and then extended forward, contracting from our left upon our center, until its apex reached halfway up [to] Crewe’s quarters.” Joseph L. Brent, Confederate staff officer, July 2, 1862
 
Erected 2011 by Richmond National Battlefield Park.
 
Location. 37° 24.864′ N, 77° 15.121′ W. Marker is in Henrico, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Willis Church Road (Virginia
Union gun positions and the West House in the distance. image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 5, 2011
2. Union gun positions and the West House in the distance.
Route 156) and Carters Mill Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located in the Malvern Hill Unit of Richmond National Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9175 Willis Church Road, Henrico VA 23231, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “the grandest sean of all” (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Malvern Hill Crest (about 600 feet away); Freeman Marker (about 600 feet away); Malvern Hill (about 600 feet away); Union Firepower (about 600 feet away); The Crew House (about 700 feet away); Advantages of Terrain (about 700 feet away); A Place of Refuge (about 700 feet away).
 
More about this marker. On the left is a photograph with the caption, "Edwin F. Jemison was just 17 years old when he was killed storming the exposed slope of Malvern Hill near this spot. Although a Georgian by birth, Jemison served with the 2nd Louisiana Infantry. Private Jemison’s youthful appearance has made this photograph a classic, used repeatedly to illustrate the far-reaching effects of the Civil War."

On the right is a photograph with the caption, "The photographer stood 100 yards to your right when he took this view. The former slave cabins still stood in the 1885 photograph. Thousands of attacking
Portrait of Pvt. Edwin Francis Jemison, 2nd Louisiana Regiment, C.S.A. image. Click for full size.
circa 1862
3. Portrait of Pvt. Edwin Francis Jemison, 2nd Louisiana Regiment, C.S.A.
Library of Congress [LC-B8184-10037]
Confederates had this very view as they advanced up the slope of Malvern Hill. Records suggest that the inhabitants had evacuated the property prior to the battle." Gilder Lehrman Collection
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Malvern Hill. Richmond National Battlefield Park (Submitted on November 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Malvern Hill. Civil War Trust (Submitted on November 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

3. Malvern Hill Battlefield Podcast. Richmond National Battlefield Park (Submitted on November 6, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Confederate viewpoint advancing up the slope of Malvern Hill. image. Click for full size.
Gilder Lehrman Collection, 1885
4. Confederate viewpoint advancing up the slope of Malvern Hill.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 406 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement