Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Quincy in Norfolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Granite Railway

 
 
The Granite Railway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sepp Bergschneider, November 12, 2011
1. The Granite Railway Marker
Inscription. National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark.
The Granite Railway
Designated by the American Society of Civil Engineers 1976
This marker commemorates the 150th anniversary of the ground breaking for the first commercial railroad in the United States
Dedicated by the City of Quincy
April 1, 1976
 
Erected 1976.
 
Location. 42° 14.772′ N, 71° 2.154′ W. Marker is in Quincy, Massachusetts, in Norfolk County. Marker is on Granite Rail Court, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Landmark is at the end of Mullin Avenue and right against the south travel lane of the Southeast Expressway (Rte. 93). Marker is in this post office area: Quincy MA 02169, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old House (approx. 1.4 miles away); William Hutchinson's Grant (approx. 1.5 miles away); John Adams (approx. 1.6 miles away); Henry Adams (approx. 1.7 miles away); The Men of Quincy, Mass. (approx. 1.7 miles away); Hancock Cemetery (approx. 1.7 miles away); Abigail Adams (approx. 1.7 miles away); United First Parish Church (approx. 1.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Quincy.
 
Regarding The Granite Railway.
The Granite Railway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sepp Bergschneider, November 12, 2011
2. The Granite Railway Marker
This gateway marks the foot of the old incline, a part of the granite railway.
The idea of the railroad was conceived and carried out by Gridley Bryant, in the face of great opposition but supported by, Thomas Handasyd Perkins, to transport the stone for the Bunker Hill Monument from the quarry to the tidewater in the Neponset River, a distance of two and three quarters miles.
Work was begun April1, 1826 and the completed railroad was opened October 7, 1826.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarksRailroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Sepp Bergschneider of Canton, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 464 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Sepp Bergschneider of Canton, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement