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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sarah Ann in Logan County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hatfield Cemetery

 
 
Hatfield Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, April 20, 2008
1. Hatfield Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Capt. Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield, 1839-1921, is buried here. He was the leader of his clan in the bitter family feud with the McCoys. A life-sized statue, modeled from photographs and imported from Italy, marks his grave.
 
Erected 1963 by West Virginia Historic Commission.
 
Location. 37° 42.225′ N, 81° 59.458′ W. Marker is near Sarah Ann, West Virginia, in Logan County. Marker is on Jerry West Highway (West Virginia Route 44), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. In front of the bridge leading to the Hatfield Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12560 Jerry West Highway, Sarah Ann WV 25644, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Buffalo Creek Disaster (approx. 7.5 miles away); Logan (approx. 9.8 miles away); Matewan Area History (approx. 11.2 miles away); Matewan and the Railroad (approx. 11.2 miles away); Mingo County / State of Kentucky
Hatfield Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, April 20, 2008
2. Hatfield Cemetery Marker
Photo taken looking north on Route 44, below marker is a stone base with plaque designating the cemetery a National Registered Historic Place. The bridge to the left leads to the cemetery up the hill, difficult to see from the marker.
(approx. 11.2 miles away); Pawpaw Tree Incident (approx. 11.2 miles away in Kentucky); Chesapeake & Ohio - 2755 Steam Locomotive (approx. 13.1 miles away); Chesapeake and Ohio Kanawha (approx. 13.1 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Life Magazine Visits the Hatfields and McCoys. Copy of 1944 article with photographs. “Devil Anse’s oldest son, Jonse, brought Randall McCoy’s pretty daughter Rosanna home from an Election Day picnic. His father wouldn’t allow a marriage, but they lived together anyway. After that, it was open war. The McCoys caught Ellison Hatfield, Anse’s brother and stabbed him fatally. Anse retaliated by tying three young McCoys to bushes beside the river and murdering them the moment he heard that Ellison was dead. One day Captain Hatfield and his clan rode boldly up to Randall McCoy’s house in Kentucky, killed his 15-year-old daughter Allifair McCoy and burned the house down. A reward was offered for him,
Hatfield Cemetery Grave Stone "Devil Anse" Hatfield image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, May 20, 2008
3. Hatfield Cemetery Grave Stone "Devil Anse" Hatfield
The names of Hatfield's children are craved in the stone below the statue of Capt. Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield.
dead or alive. There were ambushes in the woods in which many men were killed, but Devil Anse lived safely behind a drawbridge in his mountain valley home.” (Submitted on November 24, 2012.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable Persons
 
Hatfield Cemetery from a Distance image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, May 20, 2008
4. Hatfield Cemetery from a Distance
Photo taken of the cemetery about half way between the marker and the grave site. Cemetery lies up a hill from the road.
Hatfield Cemetery Designated National Registered Historic Place image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, May 20, 2008
5. Hatfield Cemetery Designated National Registered Historic Place
Anderson Hatfield (1838–1921) image. Click for full size.
By Forest McDermott, May 20, 2008
6. Anderson Hatfield (1838–1921)
Devil Anse ordered this marble statue from Italy and had it hauled here by mules before he died.
The Hatfield Clan in 1897 image. Click for full size.
Old Photo Archive, 1897
7. The Hatfield Clan in 1897
The Hatfield and McCoy feud is one of the nation's most storied family/state conflicts, lasting over 30-years and being the source of numerous conflicts that impacted trade and travel between West Virginia and Kentucky. This 1897 photo captures the entire Hatfield family a few years after they had officially ended the feud.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Forest McDermott of Masontown, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 16,544 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Forest McDermott of Masontown, Pennsylvania.   7. submitted on . • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 25, 2016.
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