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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Amsterdam in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Guy Park, 1766

 
 
Guy Park, 1766 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
1. Guy Park, 1766 Marker
Inscription.
Guy Park, 1766
Built by Sir William
Johnson for Daughter,
Molly, wife of Col. Guy
Johnson. Johnsons left
for Canada in 1775

 
Erected by New York State Education Department.
 
Location. 42° 56.859′ N, 74° 12.553′ W. Marker is in Amsterdam, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (New York State Route 5) and Evelyn Street, on the right when traveling east on West Main Street. Click for map. Marker is located between route 5 and the very busy railroad tracks in front of Guy Park Manor. Marker is in this post office area: Amsterdam NY 12010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Guy Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing); Sweet Canal Store (approx. 1.1 miles away); Chuctanunda Terrace Site (approx. 1.1 miles away); Donato (Dan) Persico, Chief T/M (approx. 1.1 miles away); Sanford Mansion (approx. 1.2 miles away); "Mother Lake" (approx. 1.3 miles away); Green Hill Cemetery (approx. 1.4 miles away); Hurricana Stock Farm (approx. 1.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Amsterdam.
 
Regarding Guy Park, 1766.
Guy Park, 1766 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
2. Guy Park, 1766 Marker
Guy Johnson (c.1740 – 5 March 1788)

Guy Johnson came from Ireland in 1756 to work for his uncle, Sir William Johnson. Guy became Deputy of Indian Affairs and took over as Superintendent upon Sir Williams death in 1774.

During the French & Indian Wars, Guy was a colonel in the local militia. He later served as a judge in Tryon County Court. He married his cousin Mary, Sir William's daughter, in 1763 and they settled on family lands near her brother and sister.

When the American Revolution began, Guy Johnson represented the British government, bringing him threats of imprisonment from local patriots who also feared his influence with the Six Nations. In July 1775 Guy Johnson, his family, loyal supporters and Mohawk allies fled to Canada. On the way, his wife died in child birth at Oswego.
Colonel Guy Johnson and several Mohawks traveled to England in 1776 to lobby for the Loyalist interest. While there, he and Karonghyontye (Capt. David Hill) posed for a portrait by Benjamin West.

By 1779 Guy Johnson had established headquarters in Niagara and was directing British raids on the Mohawk Valley. He moved to England after the war.

After Col. Johnson's flight to Canada in 1775, Guy Park was confiscated by the Tryon County Committee of Safety, and was leased to Henry Kennedy, who occupied it with his family. The Kennedy family
Guy Park, 1766 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
3. Guy Park, 1766 Marker
reported seeing the ghost of Mary Johnson, revisiting her old home much to their discomfort.

Guy Johnson's manor house, Guy Park, was built where it is because boats on the Mohawk River offered the best way to move goods and people during the 1700s. This site provided river access for the Johnson family's vast Mohawk Valley holdings and controlled the flow of goods between colonial traders and American Indians. Successive waves of transportation improvements - the Mohawk Turnpike, Erie Canal, railroads, and the Barge Canal - all reshaped Guy Park and its surroundings. After the American Revolution, river improvements and turnpikes reinforced Guy Park's key location. The stone house became a popular inn along the Mohawk Turnpike. The role faded after the Erie Canal was built on the opposite (south) side of the Mohawk River. The house was originally built facing the river, but the back door became the front when the turnpike and railroad passed by the opposite side. The Utica and Schenectady railroad trains first steamed past here in 1836. By 1853 that railroad line merged with others creating the New York Central; a railroad reaching from New York City to Buffalo, and later Chicago. In the 1840s James Stewart, a prosperous canal and railroad contractor bought Guy Park and later added the east and west wings and porches to the building. Ironically, Stewart was killed by an
Guy Park, 1766 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
4. Guy Park, 1766 Marker
The Marker is posted on the right, between the railroad tracks and West Main Street/Routes 5/67.
express train while crossing the tracks in front of the house.



This building now houses the Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce.
 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Guy Park Manor image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 31, 2010
5. Guy Park Manor
This is the north side of the building which faces the railroad tracks and Route 5.
Guy Park Manor image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
6. Guy Park Manor
This is the south side which faces the Mohawk River and Erie Canal Lock E11.
Guy Park Manor image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
7. Guy Park Manor
This is another view of the south side of the building. A freight train locomotive is passing on the north side, to the left of the building
Guy Park Manor and Eric Canal Lock E11 image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
8. Guy Park Manor and Eric Canal Lock E11
The Erie Canal passes right behind Guy Park and the lock facility is right in the "back yard". The white structure just to the right of the Guy Park Manor building is the old canal lock Powerhouse, originally used to house equipment to power the lock gates.
Lock 11 from Guy Park Manor image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous
9. Lock 11 from Guy Park Manor
The view of the Lock 11 facilites from a second floor window of Guy Park Manor.
Guy Park Manor image. Click for full size.
By Nelson. E. Baldwin, December 30, 1936
10. Guy Park Manor
Guy Park was recorded in the Historic American Buildings Survey in 1936. This is the south side which faces the Mohawk River and Lock E11 facilites.
Guy Park Manor - Flooding Due to Hurricane Irene image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 29, 2011
11. Guy Park Manor - Flooding Due to Hurricane Irene
The marker, seen in this photo, withstood the torrents of the swollen Mohawk River. Guy Park Manor did not fare so well.
Guy Park, 2011 image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 30, 2011
12. Guy Park, 2011
Guy Park - Before & After Hurricane Irene Flooding image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2010
13. Guy Park - Before & After Hurricane Irene Flooding
"<i><b>Manor That Has Stood for Centuries Teeters in Stormís Wake</b></i>" image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 2, 2011
14. "Manor That Has Stood for Centuries Teeters in Stormís Wake"
The view of the south side of Guy Park Manor from across the Mohawk River shows that the west wing, added to the building by owner James Stewart in the 1840s, sags dangerously. In the foreground the uprights which support the movable dam at Lock E11 have been badly damaged by the flooding of August 29, 2011 after Hurricane Irene.
Guy Park Rebuild image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 25, 2011
15. Guy Park Rebuild
The State of New York is repairing and rebuilding historic Guy Park.
Colonel Guy Johnson (c.1740 – 5 March 1788) image. Click for full size.
By Benjamin West, 1776
16. Colonel Guy Johnson (c.1740 – 5 March 1788)
This is a detail of the 1776 Benjamin West painting.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 966 times since then and 9 times this year. Last updated on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   15. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   16. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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