“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Golden in Jefferson County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)

Porcelain and Malted Milk

Porcelain and Malted Milk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Charles T. Harrell, July 4, 2011
1. Porcelain and Malted Milk Marker
Caption: Adolph Coors malted milk factory. Courtesy Golden Pioneer Museum.

Background photo: View over the Adolph Coors Company Brewery. Coors residence, gardens and greenhouses, circa 1930. Courtesy Denver Public Library, Western History Collection.
Inscription. With temperance pressures rising, Adolph Coors knew diversification was crucial to his industry. In 1910, he invested in John J. Herold’s pottery works at 8th and Ford Streets. During the middle of the decade, embargoes on German import porcelain created a market for high quality chemical porcelains and consumer products.

Production of the home-use pieces ceased in 1941 when Coors Porcelain reinvented itself as part of the American war effort. The company provided porcelain housings for land mines and insulators. Also, according to the Colorado Transcript, the plant had an important role in producing the atomic bomb. Coors Porcelain supplied materials used in production of the first atomic bombs. Coors continues to this day producing chemical porcelain for industrial use.

In addition to diversifying into porcelain, Adolph Coors was determined that the brewery operation would not close during prohibition. Putting his son, Grover, in charge of the new near-beer and malted milk enterprises, Adolph Coors diversified the brewing operation itself.

The near-beer was never a resounding success. When Adolph Sr. tasted the brew he is said to have remarked, “It looks like beer, and it smells like beer, but it tastes like…”

Malted milk proved to be more of a commercial success for the company. The product was sold in various forms from powders to tablets to syrup. At a time when Coors most needed economic support, Mars Candy Company ordered as much malted milk as Coors could produce. Coors malted milk was an essential component in many of Mars’ popular products through 1957.

Location. 39° 45.409′ N, 105° 13.359′ W. Marker is in Golden, Colorado, in Jefferson County. Marker is on Washington Avenue. Click for map. Marker is located on the Washington Avenue Bridge. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1060 Washington Avenue, Golden CO 80401, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Settler Farm Wife’s Initiative (here, next to this marker); First Bicycle Mishap in Golden (here, next to this marker); A Daring Rescue (here, next to this marker); Fun on Courthouse Hill (here, next to this marker); Brewing on Clear Creek-Coors History (here, next to this marker); Golden and Clear Creek (here, next to this marker); Gold (here, next to this marker); Irrigation and Farming (a few steps from this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Golden.
Categories. Industry & Commerce
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Charles T. Harrell of Woodford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 508 times since then and 103 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on , by Charles T. Harrell of Woodford, Virginia. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide area view of the marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?
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