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Berkeley in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

American Baptist Seminary of the West - Hobart Hall

City of Berkeley Landmark - designated in 1999

 

—Julia Morgan, Architect, 1919 —

 
American Baptist Seminary of the West - Hobart Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 26, 2011
1. American Baptist Seminary of the West - Hobart Hall Marker
Inscription. This compact complex of buildings linked by a series of arcades and academic quads in the English tradition was created to house one of Berkeley's oldest seminaries. Hobart Hall, designed by Julia Morgan, is notable for its elaborate brickwork, elegant arched north entry, and molded decorative terra cotta detail. In 1953, Walter H. Ratcliff, Jr., continued the Tudor Revival style with Johnson Hall to the east, and the small chapel with a double-gabled roof entry to the south. Additional campus buildings after 1964 reflect more modern architectural styles. Hobart Hall was substantially remodeled in 2000.
Berkeley Historical Plaque Project
2007

 
Erected 2007 by Berkeley Historical Plaque Project.
 
Location. 37° 51.919′ N, 122° 15.357′ W. Marker is in Berkeley, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Dwight Way and Hillegass Avenue. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2606 Dwight Way, Berkeley CA 94704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Church of Christ, Scientist (within shouting distance of this marker); Mrs. E.P. (Stella) King Building (about 700 feet away, measured
American Baptist Seminary of the West - Hobart Hall Marker wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 26, 2011
2. American Baptist Seminary of the West - Hobart Hall Marker wide view
This is the "elegant arched north entry" mentioned on the marker. The marker is barely visible here in the shadows of the archway, affixed to the pillar visible through the central arch.
in a direct line); Soda Works Building (about 700 feet away); “A People’s History of Telegraph Avenue” (about 700 feet away); Berkeley Piano Club (approx. 0.2 miles away); J. Gorman & Son Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); McCreary-Greer House (approx. 0.4 miles away); Berkeley City Club (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Berkeley.
 
Also see . . .
1. Our Campus. ABSW's campus page: "The heart of ABSW’s Berkeley campus is Hobart Hall. The four-story brick Tudor Revival building was designed by Julia Morgan and dedicated in 1921. Morgan, one of California’s most famous architects, also designed Hearst Castle in San Simeon as well as many residences and public buildings throughout the Bay Area...." (Submitted on December 21, 2011.) 

2. American Baptist Seminary of the West, Hobart Hall. SchoolDesign.com's page on the renovation of Hobart Hall, with pictures of the interior: " Renowned architect and engineer Julia Morgan designed Hobart Hall, the flagship building of the American Baptist Seminary of
Hobart Hall - south side image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 7, 2010
3. Hobart Hall - south side
the West. The four-story, 20,000-square-foot building, which was built in 1919, is a California state landmark. The building contains classrooms and offices, and is within a quarter mile of one of the most dangerous faults in California...."
(Submitted on December 21, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Education
 
Johnson Hall (left), Hobart Hall (center), and chapel (right) - view from northwest image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 26, 2011
4. Johnson Hall (left), Hobart Hall (center), and chapel (right) - view from northwest
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 613 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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