Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Riverside in Riverside County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree

 
 
Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, September 22, 2002
1. Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree Marker
Inscription.
To honor
Mrs. Eliza Tibbets,
and to commend her good work
in planting at Riverside in 1873
The First Washington
Navel Orange Trees

in California,
native to Bahia Brazil,
proved the most valuable
fruit introduction yet made by
the United States Department
of Agriculture

 
Erected 1920. (Marker Number 20.)
 
Location. 33° 56.769′ N, 117° 24.1′ W. Marker is in Riverside, California, in Riverside County. Marker is at the intersection of Arlington Avenue and Magnolia Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Arlington Avenue. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4550 Arlington Avenue, Riverside CA 92504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The First Marsh Grapefruit Trees into California (a few steps from this marker); Mount Rubidoux (approx. 2.6 miles away); Mission Inn (approx. 3 miles away); De Anza Crossing of the Santa Ana River (approx. 3.1 miles away); Jensen-Alvarado Ranch (approx. 3.4 miles away); Robidoux Grist Mill Site
Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, September 22, 2002
2. Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree Marker
(approx. 3.4 miles away); Highgrove Hydroelectric Plant (approx. 5.8 miles away); Agua Mansa (approx. 5.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Riverside.
 
Regarding Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree. The tree was introduced into the United States from Bahia, Brazil, by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1870. Twelve young trees were received and buds from them were propagated on sweet orange seedlings. In 1873 two of these greenhouse-grown trees, which were distributed throughout the United States, were sent to Mrs. Eliza Tibbets in Riverside. SOURCE: California Historical Landmarks, California State Parks
 
Also see . . .
1. Eliza Tibbets (1825 - 1898) - Find A Grave Memorial. (Submitted on December 27, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.)
2. History of the parent Washington navel orange tree. (Submitted on January 6, 2012.)
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, September 22, 2002
3. Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree
Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, September 22, 2002
4. Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree Marker
One of the two original trees from which all Washington Navel oranges in California have descended. Propagated from trees imported from Bahia, Brazil in 1870 by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, and sent to Riverside, Cal. in 1873
Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, September 22, 2002
5. Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree
Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, September 22, 2002
6. Parent Washington Navel Orange Tree
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 1,389 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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