“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

Douglass High School

Douglass High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 2, 2008
1. Douglass High School Marker
has been registered as a
Virginia Historic Landmark
by the
Virginia Department of Conservation
and Historic Resources

Throughout much of Virginia in the early 1900s, black parents were pressing the then system of racial segregation for improved educational opportunity for their children. Following the calling and achievements of abolitionist Frederick Douglass in the years after the Civil War and the efforts of other black educators in Virginia seeking to improve schools for black students, parents began organizing to influence Commonwealth and local school authorities to build schools and improve curriculums for black students - particularly secondary level.

In those days, the public education system in Virginia referred to secondary schools for black students as 'training schools.' Prior to the 1930s black students went only to the seventh grade. In Leesburg, parents would pay the principal of the grade school to teach their children eighth grade subjects before they were added to the Loudoun County school system. In the 1930s, a ninth grade facility was added in Leesburg for black students, followed shortly by a 10th grade, and which ultimately evolved into a 'training school.' Overall, school conditions for black students were poor and it was up to the students to get to school on
Marker and Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 2, 2008
2. Marker and Cornerstone
Cornerstone reads: "Douglass High School Erected 1941"
their own.

In the late 1930s a group called Parents of Loudoun County was organized and initiated an effort to establish a high school for black students in Loudoun County. While the Parents group persuaded the school board of the need for the high school there was no land available in the school system nor money to acquire land for the school. The Parents group (by now formed into the County Wide League of Parents) and a newly formed Loudoun Branch of the NAACP took up the task of finding a site and raising money to purchase it. The League and the NAACP Branch purchased this eight-acre site and granted it to the school board. The school board initiated construction in early 1941 and the high school opened in September of that year. The black community also contributed additional equipment and materials for the school's educational program. Douglass High School served the black community in Loudoun County until the desegregation of the schools in 1968-1969.

On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the opening of Douglass High School the Senate of Virginia stated well the pride and dignity held in the hearts of the black community of Loudoun County for what this school means to the past and future:
...if only the educated are free, then the establishing of an educational institution of 20th century America is a reaffirmation of freedom; ... and the enduring
Douglass Community School image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, February 2, 2008
3. Douglass Community School
The school was renamed as it the school system was desegregated.
legacy of Douglass High School resides in the hundreds of free men and women who acquired that essential component of freedom in its laboratories and classrooms...

(Virginia Senate Resolution No. 66; May 21, 1991)

The Douglass facility continues to serve special educational and community activity needs of all the people in Loudoun County. This is the most significant achievement reflecting the original purpose for which this school was built.

The Loudoun/Douglass Alumni Association dedicates this historic marker with the deepest respect and gratitude to the original ... "Parents of Loudoun County, the County Wide League, the Loudoun Branch NAACP, and other supporters for their unswerving devotion to high education of the youth in Loudoun County." ...and to ... "our teachers, each unique in their own way, excelling in all capacities to prepare us for the world today." (50th Anniversary Celebration of Douglass High School Loudoun/Douglass Alumni Association, July 6, 1991)
Location. 39° 6.592′ N, 77° 33.261′ W. Marker is in Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker is at the intersection of East Market Street (Business State Highway 7) and Sycolin Road (County Route 643), on the right when traveling west on East Market Street. Click for map. Located on the northwest corner of Douglass High School. Marker is in this post office area: Leesburg VA 20175, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Douglass Community School (within shouting distance of this marker); The Leesburg Lime Company (approx. 0.4 miles away); George Catlett Marshall (approx. 0.4 miles away); Dodona Manor (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stationmaster's House (approx. half a mile away); Leesburg Freight Station (approx. half a mile away); The Depot (approx. half a mile away); McKimmey's Mill (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Leesburg.
Categories. 20th CenturyAfrican AmericansCivil RightsEducation
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,325 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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