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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Pennsylvania Abolition Society

 
 
Pennsylvania Abolition Society Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
1. Pennsylvania Abolition Society Marker
Inscription. Founded here, 1775, as the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage. In 1787 it became the Pennsylvania Abolition Society which sought social, educational, and employment opportunities for Blacks.
 
Erected 1991 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 39° 56.848′ N, 75° 8.551′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on South Front Street north of Walnut Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tun Tavern (a few steps from this marker); Lorenzo L. Langstroth (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Bond House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hannah Callowhill Penn (about 500 feet away); The City Tavern (about 500 feet away); Philip Syng, Jr. (about 700 feet away); The Liberation of Jane Johnson (about 700 feet away); Exiles for Conscience Sake (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
Also see . . .  Founding of Pennsylvania Abolition Society. “As early as 1688, four German Quakers
Pennsylvania Abolition Society Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
2. Pennsylvania Abolition Society Marker
in Germantown near Philadelphia protested slavery in a resolution that condemned the ‘traffic of Men-body.’ By the 1770s, abolitionism was a full-scale movement in Pennsylvania. Led by such Quaker activists as Anthony Benezet and John Woolman, many Philadelphia slaveholders of all denominations had begun bowing to pressure to emancipate their slaves on religious, moral, and economic grounds.

“In April 1775, Benezet called the first meeting of the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully held in Bondage at the Rising Sun Tavern. Thomas Paine was among the ten white Philadelphians who attended; seven of the group were Quakers. Often referred to as the Abolition Society, the group focused on intervention in the cases of blacks and Indians who claimed to have been illegally enslaved. Of the twenty-four men who attended the four meetings held before the Society disbanded, seventeen were Quakers.” (Submitted on December 29, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 707 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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