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Schenectady in Schenectady County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

M-7 Day

 
 
M-7 Day Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 29, 2011
1. M-7 Day Marker
Inscription.
Saturday April 10, 1943
On this spot representatives of the
British Eight Army
paid tribute to
American Locomotive Co.
Workers

 
Location. 42° 48.904′ N, 73° 56.935′ W. Marker is in Schenectady, New York, in Schenectady County. Marker is at the intersection of Washington Ave. and State Street (New York State Route 5), on the right when traveling north on Washington Ave.. Click for map. The marker is in Schenectady's Liberty Park. Liberty Park, a memorial park, is small triangular area of 0.20 (two tenths of an acre) bounded on one side by State Street to the North, Washington Ave. on the west side, and Water Street on the south side. . Marker is in this post office area: Schenectady NY 12305, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Schenectady (here, next to this marker); Southwest Corner of Stockade (a few steps from this marker); Clench's Tavern (a few steps from this marker); Free Masonry (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Hotel Van Curler (within shouting distance of this marker); John Glen House 1740
M-7 Day Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 29, 2011
2. M-7 Day Marker
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing); Robert Sanders House 1750 (about 400 feet away); First Mill (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Schenectady.
 
Regarding M-7 Day. ALCO played a significant role in two world wars. ALCO produced hundreds of locomotives for the home front and Europe in World War One. ALCO made an even greater contribution in World War Two by producing hundreds of locomotives and thousands of tanks and armored vehicles. ALCO even developed and produced the M7 ‘Priest’ self-propelled armored artillery vehicle, a weapon which gave Allied Armies in World War Two unprecedented firepower and revolutionized the employment of artillery on the battlefield even into our modern era. The M7 was the famed "tank destroyer", which helped to deliver a decisive victory over Rommel's forces in the battle of El Alamein, the turning point in Rommel’s drive through North Africa. The M7 was a completely secret weapon - no one had heard of it, even though it had been driven through the streets of Schenectady as it was being tested!

While the first M7s were produced for the U.S. Army, supply was soon diverted to support the Lend-Lease program.
M-7 Day Marker in Liberty Park image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, December 29, 2011
3. M-7 Day Marker in Liberty Park
Ninety M7s were sent to the British 8th Army in North Africa, who were also the first to use it in battle during the Second Battle of El Alamein as well as their own Bishop,a 25-pounder gun howitzer armed self propelled gun. The M7 soon proved successful and the British requested 5,500 of them, an order which was never fully completed.

On April 10, 1943, a contingent from the British Royal Artillery and Royal Tank Regiments came to Schenectady and put on a parade in honor of the city's residents, who helped to end WWII. That day was dubbed "M7 Day."
 
Also see . . .  M7 Priest. (Submitted on December 30, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional keywords. M7 Priest Tank ALCo ALCO American Locomotive Company
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, World II
 
The Last M-7 Produced at ALCO image. Click for full size.
Efner Research Library
4. The Last M-7 Produced at ALCO
Female employees from the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) pose with the last M-7 produced by ALCO. One of ALCO’s unique contributions to the war effort was the design, development and production of the M7 “Priest” self-propelled armored artillery vehicle. It took ALCO only 19 days to meet the Army requirement for this vehicle. The M-7 was simply a 105mm howitzer mounted to an M-3 chassis. It turned out to be a weapon that gave Allied Armies in World War II unprecedented firepower and revolutionized the use of artillery on the battlefield even into our modern era.
M7 "Priest" Tank image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. M7 "Priest" Tank
"New M7 Priest 105 mm self-propelled howitzer carriages roll down the production lines of the American Locomotive Company in Schenectady, New York”, photo by H.R. Hollem
ALCO's M4 and M7 Tank Killer image. Click for full size.
Efner Research Library
6. ALCO's M4 and M7 Tank Killer
American M7 self-propelled howizer vehicle in Carentan, France, June 1944 image. Click for full size.
United States National Archives
7. American M7 self-propelled howizer vehicle in Carentan, France, June 1944
An M7 Preserved at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland image. Click for full size.
By Yellowute, June 2006
8. An M7 Preserved at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 460 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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