Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The City Tavern

 

—Independence Hall National Historical Park —

 
The City Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
1. The City Tavern Marker
Oval on the upper left of this interpretive panel invites you to call +1-267-519-4295 and enter the Building Number, 29, to hear a brief history of the tavern.
Inscription. Completed on the eve of the American Revolution to serve the elite of Philadelphia, the City Tavern soon hosted the elite of an emerging American nation.

The City Tavern, like many other 18th Century taverns, was more than a “bar.” It was a center for political discussions, business transactions, and social events. Members of the Continental Congress lodged, dined, and celebrated here.

The building in front of you is a reconstruction of the original 1773 tavern. Today visitors from around the world may enjoy lunch or dinner here at what John Adams called “the most genteel” tavern in America.

(sidebar)
The City Tavern in Philadelphia was erected at a great expense by a voluntary subscription of the principal gentlemen of the city or the convenience of the public, and is much the largest and most elegant house occupied in that way in America. —Philadelphia Packet, 1884.
 
Erected by Independence Hall National Historical Park. (Marker Number 29.)
 
Location. 39° 
The City Tavern's North Façade and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
2. The City Tavern's North Façade and Marker
56.834′ N, 75° 8.668′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker is on South 2nd Street just from Walnut Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. It is in the alley to the right of the tavern, facing the tavern. Marker is at or near this postal address: 138 S 2nd St, Philadelphia PA 19106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hannah Callowhill Penn (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Bond House (within shouting distance of this marker); Fraunces Tavern (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Philadelphia Exchange (about 300 feet away); Tun Tavern (about 500 feet away); Pennsylvania Abolition Society (about 500 feet away); Mechanics' Union of Trade Associations (about 600 feet away); “Common Sense” (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. The interpretive panel has a large color image captioned, “artist’s conception of members of the Continental Congress celebrating the anniversary of independence at the City Tavern on July 4, 1778.”
The City Tavern image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 14, 2010
3. The City Tavern
Marker is in the shadows to the right of the first tree on the right.

 
Also see . . .
1. Philadelphia's Merchants Moved from Coffee House to Tavern to This “Temple of Commerce”. Excerpt: “By the early 1770s, however, the London Coffee House did not have the capacity to cater to the business demands of a swelling city. Recognizing the need for larger quarters, several nabobs of the social and mercantile aristocracy built the Merchants’ Coffee House which came to be better known as the City Tavern. A business card distributed by an innkeeper at City Tavern in 1789 read, ‘Opened and established by the subscription of Merchants, Captains of Vessels, and other Gentlemen, at the CITY-TAVERN, in Second-street. The two Front Rooms of the house are especially appropriated to their purposes... CHANGE HOURS from 12 to 2 at Noon, and 6 to 8 in the Evening.’ The card went on to advertise rooms for rent, a restaurant, a stable, and liquors, at ‘reasonable rates’.” (Submitted on January 1, 2012.) 

2. City Tavern Restaurant. Excerpt: “From [1774] until the close of the century, City Tavern knew the patronage of the great and near-great of the American Revolution. It became
Close-up of image on marker image. Click for full size.
4. Close-up of image on marker
“Artist’s conception of members of the Continental Congress celebrating the anniversary of independence at the City Tavern on July 4, 1778.”
the practice of the members of the Second Continental Congress to dine together each Saturday at the Tavern. Eight of the delegates, Randolph, Lee, Washington, Harrison of Virginia, Alsop of New York, Chase of Maryland, and Rodney and Read of Delaware chose to form a ‘table’ and dine there daily. No doubt, matters of momentous importance were discussed and decided over a glass of Madeira and steaming roast of venison.” (Submitted on January 1, 2012.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 359 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement