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Helena in Phillips County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Service with Distinction

 
 
Service with Distinction Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
1. Service with Distinction Marker
Inscription.
Seven men from Phillips County, all of them immigrants to Arkansas, became high ranking Confederate officers. They served with honor in the Army of the Tennessee and in the Trans-Mississippi, participating in many decisive battles and campaigns.

The Arkansas Frontier, 1835-1861
Many ambitious men came to Phillip County before the Civil War, drawn by the opportunities offered by the frontier. Among them were lawyers Charles Adams and James Tappan; Patrick Cleburne, an Irish immigrant; Archibald Dobbins, a farmer; and Daniel Govan, Thomas Hindman and Lucius Polk - men of means. All enlisted in the Confederate army soon after the war began.

Serving the Confederacy,1861-1965
James Tappan saw combat first, leading the 13th Arkansas at Belmont, Missouri, in November 1861. Hindman, Cleburne, Govan, Tappan and Polk fought at the Battle of Shiloh in April 1862.

Tappan and Hindman returned to Arkansas but the other fought with the Army of Tennessee at Richmond, Perryville, Stones River, Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge. Hindman rejoined them at Chickamauga and they fought together until he was wounded at Kennesaw Mountain. The rest served together until Cleburne's death at Franklin, Tennessee, in November 1864. Hindman became commander of the military district of the Trans-Mississippi.
Service with Distinction Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
2. Service with Distinction Marker
Maple Hill Cemetery entrance.
Adams and Dobbins fought with him at Prairie Grove in December 1862. Adams later commanded the Northern Sub-District of Arkansas. Dobbins led his cavalry regiment at the Battle of Helena on July 4, 1863, and commanded a brigade at the Battle of Big Creek in Phillips County in 1864. Tappan fought in the Red River Campaign at Jenkin's Ferry.

Returning from the War
After the war Thomas Hindman went to Mexico. He was assassinated soon after returning to Helena. Archibald Dobbins fled to Brazil, where he disappeared. Lucius Polk, his health ruined, retired to his family's home in Tennessee.

Charles Adams, Daniel Govan and James Tappan returned to Phillips County. Adams moved to Memphis, practicing law until his death from yellow fever. Govan remained in Helena until 1894, when he accepted a post as an Indian agent in Washington State.

James Tappan remained in Helena, serving in the state legislature and twice declining the Democratic nomination for governor.
 
Location. 34° 32.574′ N, 90° 35.455′ W. Marker is in Helena, Arkansas, in Phillips County. Marker is on Franklin Street. Click for map. Marker in Maple Hill Cemetery at foot of hill were are buried Civil War Soldiers. Marker is in this post office area: Helena AR 72342, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are
Maj. Gen. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
3. Maj. Gen. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne
Maj. Gen. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne
Born March 17, 1828, near Ovens, County Cork, Ireland
Died at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, November 30, 1864
Buried in Confederate Cemetery, Helena, Arkansas
within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); William Patterson (approx. 0.9 miles away); "We are all the same as dead men" (approx. one mile away); Russwurm Memorial (approx. one mile away); Fort Curtis (approx. one mile away); World War I 1917-1918 (approx. one mile away); Phillips County Court House (approx. one mile away); West Helena, Arkansas (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Helena.
 
Also see . . .
1. Charles W Adams. Civil War Confederate Army Officer. He served during the Civil War first as Colonel and commander of the 23rd Arkansas Infantry regiment, then as Chief of Staff for General Thomas C. Hindman's Division in the Army of Tennessee. (Submitted on January 26, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

2. Thomas C Hindman. Confederate Major General. He was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, one of six children of a planter and Indian agent. (Submitted on January 26, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

3. James C. Tappan. Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined the Confederate Army and was commissioned Colonel of the 13th Arkansas Infantry in May 1861. (Submitted on January 26, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

4. Daniel Chevillette Govan. Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he entered the Confederate Army and was appointed Colonel in command of the 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment. (Submitted on January 26, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

5. Lucius E Polk. Civil
Brig. Gen. Lucius Eugene Polk image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
4. Brig. Gen. Lucius Eugene Polk
Brig. Gen. Lucius Eugene Polk
Born July 10, 1833, in Salisbury, North Carolina
Died Columbia, Tennessee, December 1, 1892
Buried in St. John's Churchyard at Ashwood, near Columbia, Tennessee.
War Confederate Brigadier General. Born in Salisbury, North Carolina, at the start of the Civil War he was a planter when he enlisted the Confederate Yell Rifles as a Private. (Submitted on January 26, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

6. Patrick Cleburne. Civil War Confederate Major General. The most popular Confederate division commander, he was known as the "Stonewall of the West." (Submitted on January 26, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Maj. Gen. Thomas Carmichael Hindman image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
5. Maj. Gen. Thomas Carmichael Hindman
Maj. Gen. Thomas Carmichael Hindman
Born January 28, 1828, in Knoxville, Tennessee
Died in Helena, September 28, 1868
Buried in Maple Hill Cemetery, Helena, Arkansas
Brig. Gen. James Camp Tappan image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
6. Brig. Gen. James Camp Tappan
Brig. Gen. James Camp Tappan
Born September 9, 1825, in Franklin, Tennessee
Died in Helena, Arkansas, March 19, 1906
Buried in Maple Hill Cemetery, Helena, Arkansas
Col. Archibald S. Dobbins image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
7. Col. Archibald S. Dobbins
Col. Archibald S. Dobbins
Born in 1827, near Mt. Pleasant, Tennessee
Presumed to have died about 1870 in Brazil
Brig. Gen. Daniel Chevilette Govan image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
8. Brig. Gen. Daniel Chevilette Govan
Brig. Gen. Daniel Chevilette Govan
Born July 4, 1829, in Northampton County, North Carolina
Died in Memphis, Tennessee, March 2, 1911
Buried in Hillcrest Cemetery, Holly Springs, Mississippi
Acting Brig. Gen. Charles W. Adams image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
9. Acting Brig. Gen. Charles W. Adams
Acting Brig. Gen. Charles W. Adams
Born August 16, 1817, in Boston, Massachusetts
Died in Memphis, Tennessee, September 9, 1878
Buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis
Service with Distinction Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 17, 2012
10. Service with Distinction Marker
Tombstone Marker in Maple Wood Cemetery for Maj. Gen. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne who died at the Battle of Franklin in Franklin, Tennessee.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 841 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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