Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bath in Sagadahoc County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Pitch Oven (1902)

 
 
The Pitch Oven (1902) Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 19, 2011
1. The Pitch Oven (1902) Marker
Inscription.
Caulkers used huge quantities of pitch to pay (or seal) the vessels' deck seams. In the kettles set into this freestanding brick oven, they melted crystallized pine resin over scrap-wood fires, which they carried in buckets to the decks of the schooner.

Small boys sometimes helped themselves to a free "chaw" of pitch, similar to the spruce gum enjoyed in New England - and cheaper than chewing gum!

[Background photo captions read]
The pitch oven can be seen at far right in this view of the 6-masted schooner Wyoming at her 1909 launch.

The caulker at right wields a long-handled deck iron while others drive cotton and oakum yarn into the deck seams. Photo taken at the Holly Bean shipyard in Camden.

 
Erected by Maine Maritime Museum.
 
Location. 43° 53.651′ N, 69° 48.943′ W. Marker is in Bath, Maine, in Sagadahoc County. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of the Maine Maritime Museum, 243 Washington Street. Marker is in this post office area: Bath ME 04530, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wyoming Sculpture (a few steps from this marker); The Mould Loft (1917) (a few steps
The Pitch Oven (1902) and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 19, 2011
2. The Pitch Oven (1902) and Marker
from this marker); Bath Iron Works (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of the South Ways (ca. 1867) (within shouting distance of this marker); The Caulkers' Shed (1899) (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of the Blacksmith Shop (1897, 1913) (within shouting distance of this marker); The Fitting-Out Pier (1906) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Wyoming Sculpture (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Bath.
 
More about this marker. The Maine Maritime Museum is on the grounds of the former Percy & Small Shipyard, which was the last remaining intact wooden sailing vessel shipyard in the United States.
 
Also see . . .  Maine Maritime Museum. (Submitted on January 27, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Maine Maritime Museum Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
3. Maine Maritime Museum Sign
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 442 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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