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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bath in Sagadahoc County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Wyoming Sculpture

Sparred Length (tip of jibboom/bowsprit to stern rail) 426 feet

 
 
<i>Wyoming</i> Sculpture Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 19, 2011
1. Wyoming Sculpture Marker
Inscription.
The white-painted steel structure in front of you is a sculpture representing the bow and stern of the six-mast schooner Wyoming, the largest wooden vessel built in the United States. The sculpture stands where the schooner was built in 1909, but somewhat closer to the street because of wetlands protection regulations. The sculpture is the same size as the original Wyoming.

This is the first portion of a sculpture that will eventually show the shape of the entire length of the hull, and all six masts.

The original Wyoming was a coastal schooner capable of carrying 6,000 long tons of coal. She was the largest of seven six-masters, and many other vessels, built in this shipyard.

[Background photo caption reads]
The six-mast schooner Wyoming ready to launch on December 15, 1909. Because the sculpture was built close to the street, and because this photograph was taken from a spot to the west of where you are standing, the perspective is different.

[Sculpture information]
Artists: Joe Hemes & Andreas von Huene

Artists' Design Team: Larry Bartlett, Patrick Carroll, Sam Manning, Ken Martin, Kevin Moquin, Bob Swift

2006 Builders: Reed & Reed, ARC Enterprise, Inc., Bath Iron Works Corp., S.W. Cole Engineering, Nadeau & Lodge, Pinkham
<i>Wyoming</i> Sculpture and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 19, 2011
2. Wyoming Sculpture and Marker
Bow in distance
& Greer

Inspired and informed by research and plans done by Ralph Linwood Snow and Capt. Douglas K. Lee. Archaeology by Dr. Neill DePaoli, conservation by Molly Carlson.
 
Erected by Maine Maritime Museum.
 
Location. 43° 53.662′ N, 69° 48.945′ W. Marker is in Bath, Maine, in Sagadahoc County. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of the Maine Maritime Museum, 243 Washington Street. Marker is in this post office area: Bath ME 04530, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of the South Ways (ca. 1867) (a few steps from this marker); The Pitch Oven (1902) (a few steps from this marker); Bath Iron Works (a few steps from this marker); The Mould Loft (1917) (within shouting distance of this marker); The Caulkers' Shed (1899) (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of the Blacksmith Shop (1897, 1913) (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Wyoming Sculpture (within shouting distance of this marker); The Fitting-Out Pier (1906) (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Bath.
 
More about this marker. The Maine Maritime Museum is on the grounds of the former Percy & Small Shipyard, which
<i>Wyoming</i> Sculpture image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 19, 2011
3. Wyoming Sculpture
From stern to bow
was the last remaining intact wooden sailing vessel shipyard in the United States.
 
Also see . . .
1. Maine Maritime Museum. (Submitted on January 28, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Six-masted Schooner Wyoming. (Submitted on January 28, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. The Glamorous Six Masters. (Submitted on January 28, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
Maine Maritime Museum Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
4. Maine Maritime Museum Sign
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 537 times since then and 104 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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