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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Cynthia Ann Parker and Native Americans of North Texas

 
 
Cynthia Ann Parker and Native Americans of North Texas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 21, 2010
1. Cynthia Ann Parker and Native Americans of North Texas Marker
Inscription. Native Americans hunted bison on the plains of North Texas in the 1800s. They traded freely with settlers, but conflicts did occur. Some tribal villages were attacked and some settlers’ homesteads were raided and captives taken.

In January 1861, a photo of captive Cynthia Ann Parker and her daughter Topsannah was taken in Fort Worth. In 1836 Cynthia Ann, age 9, and others had been taken from their family compound at Fort Parker by Comanche. She then lived her life as a Comanche. Comanche leader Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann had three children. In 1860 she and her daughter were captured by Texas Rangers and returned to the Parker family who lived in Tarrant County. Topsannah died in 1863. Parker’s life until she died in 1870 was spent in sadness, lonely for her life as a Comanche. Her son, Quannah, became a great leader of the Comanche as a warrior and a statesman and frequently visited Fort Worth.
 
Erected 2006 by Heritage Trails and City of Fort Worth. (Marker Number 16.)
 
Location. 32° 45.135′ N, 97° 19.772′ W. Marker is in Fort Worth, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and 8th Street on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 810 Main Street, Fort Worth TX 76102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Cynthia Ann Parker and Native Americans of North Texas Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, May 21, 2010
2. Cynthia Ann Parker and Native Americans of North Texas Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. General William Jenkins Worth (within shouting distance of this marker); Flying Machines (within shouting distance of this marker); JFK (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Flatiron Building (about 500 feet away); The Wild Bunch (about 500 feet away); Fort Worth Library (about 500 feet away); Amon G. Carter, Sr. (1879-1955) (about 600 feet away); Blackstone Hotel (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Worth.
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable EventsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 932 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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