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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Pedro in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Municipal Ferry Building - Maritime Museum

 
 
Municipal Ferry Building - Maritime Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 8, 2011
1. Municipal Ferry Building - Maritime Museum Marker
Inscription.

Municipal Ferry Building – 1941
linked San Pedro and
Terminal Island
Maritime Museum since 1979
Declared
Historio-Cultural Monument No. 146
by the
Cultural Heritage Commission
Cultural Affairs Department
City of Los Angeles

 
Erected 1975 by L. A. Cultural Heritage Commission. (Marker Number 146.)
 
Location. 33° 44.314′ N, 118° 16.731′ W. Marker is in San Pedro, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker is at the intersection of Sampson Way and East 6th Street on Sampson Way. Click for map. Marker is on the west exterior wall near the main entrance to the Maritime Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 600 Sampson Way, Berth 84, San Pedro CA 90731, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. World War II Memorial: Propeller from Heavy Cruiser U.S.S. Canberra CA-70/CAG-2 (within shouting distance of this marker); Anna Lee Fisher - Astronaut (within shouting distance of this marker); American Merchant Marine Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); American Merchant Marine Veterans Memorial Wall of Honor
Municipal Ferry Building (San Pedro, 1941) image. Click for full size.
circa 1941
2. Municipal Ferry Building (San Pedro, 1941)
- note ferry crossing the channel from the now-demolished Terminal Island Ferry Building, warships in background, and Pacific Electric interurban "Red Cars" in foreground.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); U.S.S. Los Angeles (about 400 feet away); Harry Bridges Memorial (about 500 feet away); Fishing Industry Memorial (about 600 feet away); Liberty Hill (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Pedro.
 
Regarding Municipal Ferry Building - Maritime Museum.
Text from the interior exhibit in Photo 3:

Terminal Island.
Terminal Island forms the eastern side of the main channel of Los Angeles Harbor. When the ferry buildings opened in 1941, there were around 3,000 residents and almost 100 businesses operating on the island.
The majority of residents on Terminal Island were Japanese-American fisherman and cannery workers who lived near Fish Harbor where the fishing boats docked. The neighborhood had shops, restaurants and offices of doctors, lawyers and dentists, and an elementary school.
Home No More. After the Japan[ese] attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941, many Americans viewed Japanese Americans as the enemy. In February 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 relocating all Japanese-Americans living
Inside the Maritime Museum: <br>Histories of Ferry Boats and Terminal Island image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 8, 2011
3. Inside the Maritime Museum:
Histories of Ferry Boats and Terminal Island
on the West Coast to camps far inland. After the war the residents of Terminal Island returned to find their neighborhoods had been demolished. Some moved to nearby communities and continued fishing and working in the canneries in San Pedro. Others moved away and began new lives.

“Before”.
Since the 1870s there had been regular ferry service to Terminal. Starting in 1915, there was a “team ferry” that could take 10 horse drawn carriages or cars between 1st Street in San Pedro and Ferry Street on Terminal Island. By 1940 growing numbers of commuters had outgrown the “TF”, as it was known, and residents and business owners began advocating for the city to create its own ferry service. When the municipal ferry began running in 1941 the older passenger ferries served only at night.


Illustration captions:
The “TF” ready to cross the channel, ca. 1919.
The “ACI” leaving Terminal Island for San Pedro, ca. 1937.
The “TF” preparing to leave Terminal Island. Some of the people on board may be starting a day of work.

Seventy years ago this building opened as the new ferry terminal in Los Angeles Harbor. For the next 22 years, the ferry took people between San Pedro and Terminal Island for work, school, shopping and fun. The ferry service provided a vital
L.A. Maritime Museum image. Click for full size.
By Wknight94, August 10, 2006
4. L.A. Maritime Museum
- the former Municipal Ferry Building and downtown San Pedro viewed from a cruise ship in the harbor channel, 2006.
link between the two parts of the community.
With the opening of the Vincent Thomas Bridge in 1963, the ferry was no longer needed. In 1980 after a community campaign, the building was refurbished and opened as the Los Angeles Maritime Museum.
Today as you walk through the building you will travel the path of thousands of cannery workers, longshoremen and sailors who walked up the ramp thinking of the work day ahead and walked down it thinking of the evening with family and friends to come.
 
Also see . . .
1. Los Angeles Maritime Museum. (Submitted on February 12, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. The Lost Village of Terminal Island. (Submitted on February 12, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Asian AmericansIndustry & CommerceNotable PlacesWaterways & Vessels
 
L.A. Maritime Museum, lower left - viewed from image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 8, 2011
5. L.A. Maritime Museum, lower left - viewed from
the American Merchant Marine Veterans Memorial off S. Harbor Blvd.
"Municipal Ferry Building image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 8, 2011
6. "Municipal Ferry Building
has bee placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior, 1941."
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 785 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2. submitted on .   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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