“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Gibson in Muskogee County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)


Manard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Manning, December 26, 2010
1. Manard Marker
Inscription. Site of Manard Settlement on Bayou Menard. Named for Pierre Menard (1766-1844. Menard, an early day fur trader, merchant and member of the Chouteau family. Served as the first territorial governor of Illinois.

Springs at Manard identified as a Cherokee council ground prior to 1828. Trading post est. by Bartholet & Heald in 1832. Cherokee agency est. by Montfort Stokes in 1837. Burial place of HT Martin (1822-1868), first postmaster of Cherokee Nation West.

Site of Civil War skirmish on July 27, 1862, involving US Maj. WM A Phillips and Indian Home Guards who encountered and routed Watie's Confederates under Lt Col Thos Fox Taylor.

Stage stop and site of holdup of US Mail by Cook Gang on July 14, 1894, and shooting of Joseph Glad by outlaw Jim French in 1894.

Post office from 1883-1913. Manard school est. by 1863, and closed when consolidated with Ft Gibson Schools in 1966.
Erected 2000 by Oklahoma Historical Society. (Marker Number 237-2000.)
Marker series. This marker is included in the Oklahoma Historical Society marker series.
Location. 35° 47.975′ N, 95° 6.27′ W. Marker is in Fort Gibson, Oklahoma, in Muskogee County. Marker is on U.S. 62 half a mile east of South Manard Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is only accessible from the eastbound lanes of US 62, 1/2 mile east of South Manard Road, approximately 8 miles east of Fort Gibson. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Gibson OK 74434, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Park Hill (approx. 8.4 miles away); Riley's Chapel (approx. 8.4 miles away); Park Hill Press (approx. 8.4 miles away); Trail of Tears (approx. 9.6 miles away).
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 432 times since then and 80 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on , by Michael Manning of Woodlawn, Tennessee. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A photo of the marker and the surrounding area in context. • Can you help?
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