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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Niagara-on-the-Lake in Niagara Region, Ontario — Central Canada
 

A Strategic Location

 
 
A Strategic Location Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
1. A Strategic Location Marker
Inscription.
A Strategic Location

You are standing at Mississauga Point where the Niagara River flows into Lake Ontario. Long ago the lakes and rivers were military supply and transportation routes and forts were built to protect them.

The large stone fort across the river is Fort Niagara. The French built a fort here in 1687, and the present one was begun in 1720. In August 1759 the British captured the fort after a lengthy seige. Prideaux and Johnston streets in Niagara-on-the-Lake are named after the two successful commanders. In 1796, Fort Niagara was turned over to the United States, by the terms of Jay's Treaty. The Niagara River now marked the boundary between the British colony and the United States, and cannons from the American fort easily commanded the mouth of the river. You are standing within range of those cannons from long ago.

As early as 1790 Mississauga Point had been identified as the location for a fort. Plans for a battery of 14 cannons to oppose Fort Niagara date from 1799. Instead, the first lighthouse on the Great Lakes was built here in 1804 and Fort George was built farther upstream.

The Battle of Fort George

Some of the fiercest fighting of the War of 1812 occurred during the Battle of Fort George in
A Strategic Location Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
2. A Strategic Location Marker
Close-up view of the illustration on the historical marker showing the American landing during the Battle of Fort George.
May 1813. The British and Canadians, together with Aboriginal peoples allied with them, fought to oppose an American landing on Lake Ontario.

Fearing that the lighthouse might be filled with explosives, the Americans landed near Two Mile Creek, several miles to the west.

An artillery battery manned by Canadian militia was located near this spot during the battle. It was overwhelmed by cannon fire from two US vessels, the USS Julia, and the USS Growler, at point blank range.

After the battle, the defeated British withdrew to a fortified position at Burlington Heights, and the Americans gained a base on the Niagara Peninsula. Checked at the battles of Stoney Creek, and Beaver Dams, the Americans were unable to take advantage of their victory. US forces were pinned down in Newark, which they burned and abandoned on 10 December, 1813.
 
Location. 43° 15.697′ N, 79° 4.59′ W. Marker is in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, in Niagara Region. Marker can be reached from Simcoe Street just north of Front Street. Click for map. This historical marker is located on the Canadian side of the mouth of the Niagara River, where the river empties into Lake Ontario. It is situated along the river on the northern edge of the Niagara-on-the-Lake Golf Course, inside of the earthworks
A Strategic Location Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
3. A Strategic Location Marker
View of the historical marker situated inside of the fortification, just southeast of the fort's brick tower.
surrounding Fort Mississauga, just to the southeast of the brick fortification that is situated in the center of Fort Mississauga. Marker is in this post office area: Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario L0S 1J0, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Fort Evolves (a few steps from this marker); Fort Mississauga (within shouting distance of this marker); Point Mississauga Lighthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Mississauga is a National Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Mississauga Trail (about 210 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Remains of Three Soldiers (approx. 0.7 kilometers away); The Battle of Fort George (approx. 0.7 kilometers away); Niagara on the Lake Historical District (approx. 0.8 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesWar of 1812
 
A Strategic Location image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
4. A Strategic Location
View of the American Fort Niagara, as seen from across the Niagara River, from the walls of Fort Mississauga.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 527 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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