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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
East Corner in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone East

 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
1. Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker
Inscription.
Original Federal Boundary Stone
District of Columbia
Placed 1791-1792
Protected by Dist. of Co. Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1916

 
Erected 1916 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Original Federal Boundary Stones marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.573′ N, 76° 54.573′ W. Marker is in East Corner, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Eastern Avenue and Southern Avenue, on the left when traveling east on Eastern Avenue. Click for map. Marker is about 50 feet east of the intersection, in a wooded area. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. All Veterans of Seat Pleasant (approx. mile away in Maryland); Misery (approx. 0.4 miles away in Maryland); In Honor of the Men and Women of Fairmount Heights who Served in World War II (approx. 0.6 miles away in Maryland); Original Federal Boundary Stone SE 1 (approx. one
Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
2. Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker
(Newly Painted)
mile away); Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 9 (approx. one mile away); Highland Park High School (approx. 1.1 miles away in Maryland); A Whirl on the Ferris Wheel (approx. 1.3 miles away); With These Hands (approx. 1.5 miles away).
 
Regarding Original Federal Boundary Stone East. This marker is known as the East marker, as it marks the most eastern part of the District of Columbia.
 
Also see . . .
1. DC DAR website on Boundary Stones. (Submitted on February 10, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.)
2. Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. (Submitted on April 3, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
3. The Boundary Monuments. of the District of Columbia, Marcus Baker May 1897. (Submitted on October 12, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
3. Original Federal Boundary Stone East Marker
Southeast Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
4. Southeast Side of Marker
Because this stone is in the eastern corner of DC, two sides of this marker (NE and SE) face the state of Maryland.
Northeast Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
5. Northeast Side of Marker
Another of the two sides of this marker that face the state of Maryland.
Northwest Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
6. Northwest Side of Marker
This side is split between between "Maryland" and the "Jurisdiction of the United States".
Southwest Side of Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
7. Southwest Side of Marker
This side is split between between the "Jurisdiction of the United States" and "Maryland".
East Corner image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne
8. East Corner
Marcus Baker's 1897 photo of the East Corner Monument.
Corner of Eastern and Southern Avenues North East image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2014
9. Corner of Eastern and Southern Avenues North East
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,826 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   8, 9. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on January 23, 2017.
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