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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Northwest in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Logan Memorial

National Mall & Memorial Parks

 
 
John Logan Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
1. John Logan Memorial Marker
Inscription.
“We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. All that the consecrated wealth and taste of the Nation can add to their adornment and security is but a fitting tribute to the memory of her slain defenders.” John A. Logan

Photo: John A. Logan 1826-1886

Politician turned soldier, Illinois Congressman John Alexander Logan ranks among the great Civil War heroes. Faithful to Abraham Lincoln and the Union, he courageously fought alongside Federal troops in 1861 at the First Battle of Bull Run in Virginia. After four years of service, Maj. Gen. Logan proudly led the Union Army of the Tennessee along Pennsylvania Avenue in the 1865 Grand Review of the victorious Union armies. Once again a politician, Logan championed veterans’ rights as chairman of the powerful House Committee on Military Affairs, and as the 1884 Republican nominee for Vice President of the United States. Logan’s great legacy emerges each May when this Nation recognizes all its fallen military heroes on Memorial Day.

Photo: As Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), a Union veterans organization, Logan issued General Order No. 11 in 1868, establishing May 30 as Decoration Day. After the First World War, Decoration Day evolved into Memorial Day to honor every American who died in wartime service.
John Logan Memorial Marker - illustrations image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
2. John Logan Memorial Marker - illustrations
In 1971, Congress changed the date from May 30 to the last Monday in May.

Photo: The Republican Party nominated Logan as James G. Blaine’s Vice-Presidential running mate in 1884.

Photo: April 9, 1901 – President William McKinley (seated at center, above) officiated the Logan Memorial dedication ceremony. The Memorial took its place at the Iowa – later Logan – Circle. Unique among Washington’s equestrian tributes, with statue and main pedestal each cast in bronze, this memorial incorporates the visions of American sculptor Franklin Simmons and Logan’s widow, Mary.

Photo: December 26, 1886 – John A. Logan died. He laid in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda and later was buried in Washington’s Soldiers’ Home National Cemetery.

{Photos} Courtesy: Dallas Heritage Village – Dallas Texas [Memorial Day image]; Library of Congress [all other images].
 
Erected 2011 by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 54.574′ N, 77° 1.746′ W. Marker is in Northwest, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Rhode Island Avenue, NW (U.S. 29) west of the Logan Circle traffic loop. Click for map. The
John Logan Memorial - Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 25, 2012
3. John Logan Memorial - Logan Circle
marker panel is off the walkway in the eastern section of Logan Circle Park which is inside the Logan Circle traffic loop. It is accessible to pedestrians from either the eastern or western extensions of P Street and Rhode Island Avenue - or the northern or southern extensions of 13th Street and Vermont Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20006, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Major General John A. Logan (within shouting distance of this marker); A Neighborhood Reborn (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Logan Circle (within shouting distance of this marker); If These Mansions Could Talk (within shouting distance of this marker); The Artistic Life (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Charles M. “Sweet Daddy” Grace Residence (about 300 feet away); Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence (about 400 feet away); Pratt House (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Northwest.
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
John A. Logan 1826 - 1886 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
4. John A. Logan 1826 - 1886
(Library of Congress)
Blaine & Logan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
5. Blaine & Logan
The Republican Party nominated Logan as James G. Blaine's Vice-Presidential running mate in 1884. (Library of Congress)
While above them floats 'Old Glory', Boon to all the world oppressed. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
6. While above them floats 'Old Glory', Boon to all the world oppressed.
As Commander of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), a Union veterans organization, Logan issued General Order Number 11 in 1868,establishing May 30 as Decoration Day. After the First World War, Decoration Day evolved into Memorial Day to honor every American who died in wartime service. In 1971, Congress changed the date from May 30 to the last Monday in May.(Courtesy: Dallas Heritage Village – Dallas Texas)
McKinley at Logan Memorial Dedication image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
7. McKinley at Logan Memorial Dedication
April 9, 1901 -- President William McKinley (seated at center, above) officiated the Logan Memorial dedication ceremony. The Memorial took its place at the center of Iowa -- later Logan -- Circle. Unique among Washington's equestrian tributes, with statue and main pedestal each cast in bronze, this memorial incorporates the visions of sculptor Franklin Simmons and Logan's widow, Mary. (Library of Congress)
Lying in State image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
8. Lying in State
December 26, 1886 -- John A. Logan died. He laid in state in the U.S. Capitol rotunda and later was buried in Washington's Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. (Library of Congress)
John A. Logan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
9. John A. Logan
Franklin Simmons' equestrian statue
Franklin Simmons' Equestrian Statue of John A. Logan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
10. Franklin Simmons' Equestrian Statue of John A. Logan
Senator Logan of Illinois image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
11. Senator Logan of Illinois
Logan taking the oath as a U.S. Senator
(on the pedestal of the memorial)
Major General Logan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
12. Major General Logan
(on the pedestal of the memorial)
John Logan Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 17, 2013
13. John Logan Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 841 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   13. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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