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Old Soldiers Home in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Memorial Day Order

 
 
Memorial Day Order marker. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 26, 2008
1. Memorial Day Order marker.
Inscription. General Orders No. 11

Headquarters, Grand Army of the Republic
Washington, D.C., May 5, 1868


I. The 30th day of May, 1868 is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late Rebellion, and those bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land. In this observance no form or ceremony is prescribed, but posts and comrades will in their own way arrange such fitting services and testimonials of respect as circumstances may permit.

We are organized, comrades, as our regulations tell us, for the purpose, among other things, "of preserving and strengthening those kind fraternal feelings which have bound together the soldiers, sailors, and marines who united to suppress the late Rebellion." What can aid more to assure this result than by cherishing tenderly the memory of our heroic dead, who made their breasts a barricade between our country and its foes? Their soldier lives were the reveille of freedom to a race in chains and their deaths a tattoo of rebellious tyranny in arms. We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. All that the consecrated wealth and taste of the nation can add to their adornment and security is but a fitting tribute to the memory of her slain defenders.
Tomb of Major General Logan (first commander of the G.A.R.) and his family. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 2, 2008
2. Tomb of Major General Logan (first commander of the G.A.R.) and his family.
Memorial Day Order marker is to the left of the tomb's entrance.
Let no wanton foot tread rudely on such hallowed grounds. Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no vandalism of avarice or neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.

If other eyes grow dull and other hands slack, and other hearts cold in the solemn trust, ours shall keep it well as long as the light and warmth of life remains in us.

Let us, then, at the time appointed, gather around their sacred remains and garland the passionless mounds above them with the choicest flowers of springtime. Let us raise above them the dear old flag they saved from dishonor. Let us in this solemn presence renew our pledges to aid and assist those whom they have left among us a sacred charge upon the nation's gratitude - the soldier's and sailor's widow and orphan.

II. It is the purpose of the commander-in-chief to inaugurate this observance with the hope that it will be kept up from year to year. While a survivor remains to honor the memory of his departed comrades, he earnestly desires the public press to call attention to this order and lend its friendly aid in bringing it to the notice of comrades in all parts of the country in time for simultaneous compliance therewith.

III. Department commanders
The Logan Family Tomb. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 2, 2008
3. The Logan Family Tomb.
will use every effort to make this order effective by command of
John A. Logan, Commander-in-chief.

N. P. Chipman, Adjutant General.
 
Erected 1936 by National Woman's Relief Corps (the Auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic).
 
Location. 38° 56.641′ N, 77° 0.602′ W. Marker is in Old Soldiers Home, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Harewood Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 21 Harewood Rd, NW, Washington DC 20011, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Paul's Episcopal Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home (approx. 0.2 miles away); U. S. Soldiers' Home (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Paul's Episcopal (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Totten (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Totten (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Totten (approx. 0.4 miles away); Winfield Scott (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Old Soldiers Home.
 
More about this marker. Marker is at the Logan Tomb inside the grounds of the U.S. Armed Forces Retirement Home (a.k.a. the U.S. "Soldiers'" or "Soldiers' and Airmen's" Home)
U. S. "Soldier's Home" National Cemetery. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 2, 2008
4. U. S. "Soldier's Home" National Cemetery.
National Cemetery. Its entrance is across the street from the Armed Forces Retirement Home, on Harewood Road between Rock Creek Cemetery Road and North Capitol Street, NW.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The John Logan Memorial Marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Memorial Day. (Submitted on May 3, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. John A. Logan. (Submitted on May 3, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Grand Army of the Republic. (Submitted on May 3, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
4. Find a Grave: "Famous" interments, Soldiers Home National Cemetery. (Submitted on June 19, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Gettysburg Address, G.A.R.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsHeroesWar, US Civil
 
President Lincoln's Address at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863.. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 2, 2008
5. President Lincoln's Address at Gettysburg, November 19, 1863..
Marker at the Soldier's Home National Cemetery headquarters building re: the Union's honored dead.
Maj. Gen. John A. Logan - author of the the Memorial Day Order. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 2, 2008
6. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan - author of the the Memorial Day Order.
Statue at Logan Circle, Vermont & Rhode Island Ave, NW, Washington, DC.
Memorial Day Ceremony, image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 27, 1996
7. Memorial Day Ceremony,
U.S. Armed Forces Retirement Home (a.k.a. "Soldiers Home") National Cemetery, 1996.
Buffalo Soldier Re-enactor at Special Memorial Day Tribute, 1996 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 27, 1996
8. Buffalo Soldier Re-enactor at Special Memorial Day Tribute, 1996
Honoring the three Afro-American Medal of Honor recipients interred at the Soldiers Home National Cemetery: Sgt. Thomas Boyne, Sgt. John Denny, and Sgt. Benjamin Brown.
Medal of Honor grave marker for Sgt. Benjamin Brown, Section K, Site 7519 image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 31, 2016
9. Medal of Honor grave marker for Sgt. Benjamin Brown, Section K, Site 7519
Next to the grave of Pvt. Spencer,

Medal of Honor citation:
Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company C, 24th U.S. Infantry
Place and date: Arizona, May 11, 1889
Birth: Spotsylvania County, Va.
Date of issue: February 19, 1890
Citation: Although shot in the abdomen, in a fight between a paymaster's escort and robbers, did not leave the field until again wounded through both arms.
Medal of Honor grave marker for Sgt. John Denny, Section K, Grave 7020 image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, July 31, 2016
10. Medal of Honor grave marker for Sgt. John Denny, Section K, Grave 7020
Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company C, 9th U.S. Cavalry
Place and date: At Las Animas Canyon, N. Mex., September 18, 1879
Entered service at: 1867, Elmira, N.Y.
Birth: Big Flats, N.Y.
Date of issue: November 27, 1891
Citation: Removed a wounded comrade, under a heavy fire, to a place of safety.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,453 times since then and 41 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   9, 10. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 15, 2016.
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