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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rancho Cucamonga in San Bernardino County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Red Hill

City of Rancho Cucamonga Historic Point of Interest

 
 
Red Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
1. Red Hill Marker
Inscription. This site sits at the base of the prominent Red Hill Landmark. The early historic importance of the property stems from its proximity to a reliable water source, Cucamonga Creek, and to its location on the major roadway between Los Angeles and San Bernardino. By about 1200 AD, the Kukumonga Native Americans, part of the Gabrielino Culture, established a village near Red Hill in 1839. Tiburcio Tapia, a wealthy merchant and former Alcalde (Major) of Los Angeles, was granted 13,000 acres of land known as Rancho De Cucamonga. Using Indian labor, Tapia built a well fortified adobe home on Red Hill, and raised great cattle herds. Tapia also began a successful winery known to us today as the Thomas Winery, John Rains, a former soldier from Alabama and rancher, married the wealthy Doņa Maria Merced Williams, and together they purchased the ranch in 1858. The couple built a burned brick home, just to the north on Vineyard which is now a San Bernardino County Museum. Before his murder in 1862, Rains had greatly expanded the vineyards and winery developed by Tapia. This site was part of the transportation system used by many generations including the Butterfield Stage Coach, the Pacific Electric "Red Car" Railway, and Route 66. The first post office in the area, commissioned by President Abraham Lincoln in 1864, was located here. The property also
Red Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
2. Red Hill Marker
contained the Cutter residence and store, and the Riche residence and store. Detailed archaeological investigations where performed to document these structures, which had been demolished many years ago.
 
Erected by City of Rancho Cucamonga.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the U.S. Route 66 marker series.
 
Location. 34° 6.41′ N, 117° 36.676′ W. Marker is in Rancho Cucamonga, California, in San Bernardino County. Marker is at the intersection of Foothill Boulevard (Route 66) and Vineyard Avenue, on the right when traveling west on Foothill Boulevard. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8916 Foothill Boulevard, Rancho Cucamonga CA 91730, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tapia Adobe Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Cucamonga Winery (within shouting distance of this marker); Bear Gulch (approx. ū mile away); Cucamonga Service Station (approx. one mile away); Madonna of the Trail (approx. 2.3 miles away); George Chaffey, Jr. (approx. 2.3 miles away); WCTU Fountain (approx. 3.6 miles away); Mule Car (approx. 3.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Rancho Cucamonga.
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Casa De Rancho Cucamongo Rains Home built in 1860. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
3. Casa De Rancho Cucamongo Rains Home built in 1860.
Tiles of the Butterfield Stage Coach 1850-1890's image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
4. Tiles of the Butterfield Stage Coach 1850-1890's
Tiles of the Red Car circa 1900-1940. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
5. Tiles of the Red Car circa 1900-1940.
Vineyard Gateway image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
6. Vineyard Gateway
Route 66 Emblem across the street. image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 19, 2010
7. Route 66 Emblem across the street.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 868 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of the John Rains home, now a museum. • Can you help?
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