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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

James Doris Farmhouse

1857-1858

 
 
James Doris Farmhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
1. James Doris Farmhouse Marker
Inscription. This vernacular Greek Revival style, side-gabled house is significant as an example of a style locally popular between 1830 and 1860. One of the few remaining houses of the "stagecoach inn" design characteristically being two bays wide and five bays deep, the original building was executed in red brick and a later 1930s addition was constructed in lighter brick. The house was used by the Doris family as a boarding house for Irish immigrants and is significant for its association with the social development patterns of an early immigrant neighborhood.

Designated February 26, 2008
 
Erected 2012 by the Madison Landmarks Commission. (Marker Number 172.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin, Madison Landmarks Commission marker series.
 
Location. 43° 4.07′ N, 89° 23.489′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street and South Bedford Street, on the right when traveling east on West Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 605 West Main Street, Madison WI 53703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Milwaukee Road Depot (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct
James Doris Farmhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
2. James Doris Farmhouse Marker
This view of the West Main Street side of the building clearly shows the distinction between the original, 1857-58 red brick on the left, and the lighter brick on the later 1930s addition to the right. The marker is to the right of the front door.
line); Wiedenbeck-Dobelin Warehouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); American Tobacco Co. Warehouses (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dowling Apartments (approx. 0.2 miles away); Washington Grade and Orthopedic School (approx. ¼ mile away); Brittingham Boat House (approx. ¼ mile away); Derrick C. Bush House (approx. ¼ mile away); James and Bridget Casserly House (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding James Doris Farmhouse. According to the Madison Landmarks Commission, "The Doris House is a two-story, side-gabled example of the Greek Revival style that was popular nationally and locally for civic and residential buildings from 1830-1860.

"The Doris House is a remnant of the social development of the Bassett Neighborhood. Besides being one of the earliest homes built in the neighborhood, the Doris House is one of the few remaining examples of an Irish homestead whose owners opened their doors to visitors and residents of the growing Bassett Neighborhood. Railroad hotels and boarding houses, such as this,
James Doris Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
3. James Doris Farmhouse
This is another view of the West Main Street side of the building, on the left, and the south corner.
were once well represented in Madison but most of them are now gone. John Doris Sr. and his family built the family’s homestead two blocks from the west railroad depot, where inbound passenger and freight trains provided a steady stream of workers, visitors and immigrants. Between 1858 and 1973 Doris family members were associated with other hotels, boarding houses, saloons and grocery stores in the 4th ward. In 2002, the Doris House was renovated and became part of the 4th Ward Lofts development project."
 
Also see . . .  Madison Landmarks Commission. The landmark nomination form for the building (pdf). (Submitted on March 3, 2012, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. James Doris House Madison Wi
Dear Editor. I viewed the Historical marker that was placed at the James Doris House, Madison Wi. The marker that was placed has wrong information. My grandparents lived in the home. My mother was born there. I was also raised there.The home was built in 1852 by John Doris sr. who came from County Longford Ireland. John Sr. was a mason who built the house for his family. He had six sons and two daughters. It did not become a boarding house until the death of John Sr. and his wife. Two of the sons James and John converted the family home.Rose and Julia McNamara, the
James Doris Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, February 26, 2012
4. James Doris Farmhouse
This is a view of the back side of the building.
granddaughters of John Sr. also owned the home for several years until it was inherited by a great nephew William Francis Doris known as Billy Boy. When his wife Margaret passed away in 1988 it was sold. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted July 10, 2012, by Terry Maloney of Madison, Wisconsin.

 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
James Doris Farmhouse circa 1948 image. Click for full size.
circa 1948
5. James Doris Farmhouse circa 1948
James Doris Farmhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Terry Maloney, 1973
6. James Doris Farmhouse Marker
This is the rear yard of the Doris house taken in late winter 1973.It shows the portion of the home that was added shortly after 1900. In the left of the photo can be seen the brick stairwell that replaced the wooden stairwell in the 1930's.
Pat Maloney and Billy Boy Doris image. Click for full size.
circa 1940's
7. Pat Maloney and Billy Boy Doris
William Doris (on right) last Doris family member to own home.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 662 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   5. submitted on .   6. submitted on , by Terry Maloney of Madison, Wisconsin.   7. submitted on , by Terry Maloney of Madison, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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