Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Grand Prairie in Dallas County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

LiveStone Lodge No. 152, F. & A. M.

 
 
Historical marker in front of the original lodge building. image. Click for full size.
By Odin Clack, circa November 2007
1. Historical marker in front of the original lodge building.
Inscription. Originally built east of Grand Prairie near the African American community known as “The Line,” LiveStone Lodge No. 152, Free and Accepted Masons, was granted a charter on July 24, 1903 by the Prince Hall Masons of Texas.

In 1944, the lodge building was moved to the Dalworth community. The site, in one of the few areas where African Americans were allowed to buy property, cost $200. As at “The Line,” LiveStone members, leaders in the African-American community of Grand Prairie, have continued to provide a center for community gatherings, education, and public meetings.
 
Erected 1997 by Live Stone Lodge No. 152, F&AM. (Marker Number 12012.)
 
Location. 32° 44.181′ N, 97° 1.65′ W. Marker is in Grand Prairie, Texas, in Dallas County. Marker is on SW 18th Street north of Beaumont Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1802 Beaumont, Grand Prairie TX 75051, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Arlington Downs Racetrack and Fountain (approx. 2.5 miles away); Site of Arlington Downs Racetrack (approx. 2.6 miles away);
Live Stone Lodge No. 152 F&AM (also known as "Momma's House") image. Click for full size.
circa November 2007
2. Live Stone Lodge No. 152 F&AM (also known as "Momma's House")
Carver Dixon King (approx. 4.5 miles away); Bankhead Highway Through Arlington (approx. 4.6 miles away); Booker T. Washington School (approx. 5 miles away); Sloan-Journey Expedition of 1838 (approx. 5.6 miles away); Site of Bird's Fort (approx. 5.6 miles away); Bear Creek Community (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
Regarding LiveStone Lodge No. 152, F. & A. M.. The Most Worshipful Grand Master of Prince Hall Masons in Texas Jurisdiction, J.W. McKinney, granted dispensation to Livestone Masonic Lodge #152 on the 24th day of July, 1903.

Seeing the need of brotherhood and fraternity to bind our community together, our Masonic forefathers petitioned the Grand Lodge of Texas for a charter to open a Lodge. The following Worthy Master Masons reading in the vicinity of Grand Prairie were involved in the petition to be organized as a Lodge: L.C. Combs, J.R. Moore, Charles E. Swan, Henry Williams, Joe Taylor, and Aaron Jones. These men were authorized and empowered to open a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons in the town of Grand Prairie, County of Dallas Texas.

The Lodge building was originally built for the newly formed
Live Stone Lodge No. 152 as it stands today. image. Click for full size.
By Grand Prairie Reporter, February 6, 2008
3. Live Stone Lodge No. 152 as it stands today.
The building is showing its old age and is suffering from years of neglect and lacks the funds needed to preserve the building. Preservation Texas, a private, non-profit, state wide preservation organization, has added the old lodge building to its 2008 List of Texas’ Most Endangered Historic Places.
Lodge in the vicinity of Antioch Baptist Church and Cemetery, near the black community known as “The Line”. “The Line” was so named because it was a row of homesteads owned by recently freed slaves of area settlers and freedman migrating to the area from southeastern Texas. The cemetery remains at the location, at the now named Hardy Road and Avenue D in the Lakeview addition, but has now been renamed American Memorial Cemetery. Many of the original African American residents of Grand Prairie are buried in this cemetery.

At this site, the slaves that were freed following the Civil War made a “colored” community. The Lodge building was used by “The Line” residents for many community, not just Lodge meetings. According to Mrs. Iola Reed Smith, as documented on audiotape by Mrs. Ruthie Jackson, June 30, 1986, it was used as a schoolhouse and church. Mrs. Iola remembers her school days at this building site. According to Mrs. Smith, the Lodge Hall also originally housed the Evening Chapel A.M.E. Church in the churches’ earlier days before the congregation could secure their own building.

In 1944, the Lodge building was relocated to the Dalworth community, and placed on land purchased from the Dalworth Company for $200.00 dollars, at its present location at 18th St. and Beaumont.
At the time that the building was
Cornerstone installed when the building was moved to Dalworth in 1944 image. Click for full size.
By Grand Prairie Reporter, circa February 6, 2008
4. Cornerstone installed when the building was moved to Dalworth in 1944
At the time that the building was relocated, a new cornerstone was installed in the foundation, to the right of the front door. This building cornerstone of white marble reads: “Livestone #152 F. & A.M. Organized July 24, 1903. Laid by Metropolitan Lodge #146 F. & A.M. July 22, 1945.”
relocated, a new cornerstone was installed in the foundation, to the right of the front door. This building cornerstone of white marble reads:

Livestone #152 F. & A.M.
Organized July 24, 1903
Laid by Metropolitan Lodge #146 F. & A.M.
July 22, 1945

The building served the Dalworth Community in multiple ways, as it had when located at “The Line”. It served as a community-meeting place, a social center, and again as a school. For a couple of years, around 1944, while the Dalworth School was being built, David Daniels conducted 6th and 7th grade classes in the upstairs room of the Lodge. Box suppers and community socials were held in the downstairs room periodically. And, while Lodge meetings were held in the upstairs room, the first floor was used by members of the Dalworth chapters of Eastern Star and the Heroines of Jericho (which were formed by the Livestone Lodge) for their meetings and community events.

According to current members David Daniels and Sam Brown, some of the builders of the Lodge were: Mose Jordan (Past Worshipful Master), M.G. Tallie, Willie Shelton, Eddie Dance, Tom Dell, Leon Shelton, Charlie Dawson, Charlie Reese, Harry Fisher, and Robert Shelton. Livestone Lodge has had a major impact on its community throughout its history, both as a physical structure and in the spirit of its members who have been the leaders
LiveStone Lodge No. 152, F. & A. M. Marker, with the lodge building no longer there image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, October 12, 2013
5. LiveStone Lodge No. 152, F. & A. M. Marker, with the lodge building no longer there
in the African American community of Grand Prairie.
 
Additional comments.
1. Lodge Building
As of October 12, 2013, the lodge building is no longer at the site of the marker.
    — Submitted November 24, 2013, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas.

 
Additional keywords. Masonic, Lodge, Prince Hall, F&AM, Freemason
 
Categories. African AmericansEducationFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Odin Clack of Irving, Texas. This page has been viewed 4,146 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Odin Clack of Irving, Texas.   2. submitted on , by Odin Clack of Irving, Texas.   3, 4. submitted on , by Odin Clack of Irving, Texas.   5. submitted on , by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement