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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oldtown in Forsyth County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bethabara Fort 1756-63

(reconstructed)

 
 
Bethabara Fort 1756-63 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
1. Bethabara Fort 1756-63 Marker
Inscription. The French and Indian War (1754-63) prompted the peaceful Moravians, in the midst of busy harvest time and in only 18 days, to build a five-sided palisade around the central part of the community. Later, such fortifications were added to the mill and graveyard nearby. Fortunately, the Indians never attacked Bethabara.

"Next day, after dinner, Br. Jacob Loesch called the Single Brethren together to decide the matter discussed on the 4th, which was quickly done, the unanimous conclusion being that all work, except the harvesting, should be dropped until a palisade had been built around the houses, making them safe before the first incursion of the Indians should take place. Duties were assigned to each man, felling trees, digging the trench, continuing the harvesting."
Bethabara Diary, July 5, 1756.
 
Erected by Historic Bethabara Park.
 
Location. 36° 9.3′ N, 80° 17.86′ W. Marker is in Oldtown, North Carolina, in Forsyth County. Marker can be reached from Bethabara Road, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located in Historic Bethabara Park. Marker is in this post office area: Winston Salem NC 27106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
entrance to Bethabara Fort image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
2. entrance to Bethabara Fort
. Gemeinhaus 1756 (a few steps from this marker); Family House 1758 (a few steps from this marker); Vorsteher's House 1758 (within shouting distance of this marker); Apothecary Shop 1763 (within shouting distance of this marker); Congregation Kitchen 1766 (within shouting distance of this marker); Pottery Shop 1755 (within shouting distance of this marker); Bell House (within shouting distance of this marker); Well 1763 (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Oldtown.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesSettlements & SettlersWar, French and Indian
 
outside of fort looking from Vorsteher's House at Gemeinhaus(1788) image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
3. outside of fort looking from Vorsteher's House at Gemeinhaus(1788)
inside fort looking at/from Family House (1758) marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
4. inside fort looking at/from Family House (1758) marker
inside fort looking at/from Congregation Kitchen marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
5. inside fort looking at/from Congregation Kitchen marker
From Inside Fort image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
6. From Inside Fort
inside fort looking at/from Brothers House marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
7. inside fort looking at/from Brothers House marker
Inside Fort Looking At Pottery Corner image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
8. Inside Fort Looking At Pottery Corner
Inside Fort Looking From Pottery Corner image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
9. Inside Fort Looking From Pottery Corner
outside fort looking at/from Smith's House image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, February 22, 2012
10. outside fort looking at/from Smith's House
Bethabara Fort image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, January 25, 2012
11. Bethabara Fort
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 311 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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