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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Rhems in Georgetown County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Black Mingo Creek:

Fighting Among Neighbors

 
 
Black Mingo Creek: Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
1. Black Mingo Creek: Marker
Inscription. In September 1780, Francis Marion returned to South Carolina after a short tactical retreat into the swamps of eastern North Carolina. Hearing that British and Loyalist forces were burning the homes of Whig militiamen in Williamsburg District, Col. Marion aimed to challenge their control of the area.

Marion marched his men across the Great Pee Dee and Lynches Rivers to strike at a Tory detachment at Sheppard’s Ferry on Black Mingo Creek. Stationed at Patrick Dollard’s tavern less than a mile downstream from the trading village of Willtown, some fifty Tory militiamen under the command of Capt. John Coming Ball guarded the ferry crossing.

Arriving at night, Marion crossed the Black Mingo on a bridge at Willtown. The sound of the horses' hooves on the wooden planks roused the Tories, who formed a line in a clearing opposite Dollard’s tavern (located across the creek from you on the other side of the bridge). Marion divided his force into three detachments, attempting to surround them. The brief but bloody fight sent most of the Tories fleeing into the nearby swamps (behind you on this side of the creek), leaving the Whigs with a considerable store of much-needed weapons, ammunition, and horses. After the destruction of so many homes in Williamsburg, the victory at Black Mingo provided an important boost ~ practical and psychological
Black Mingo Creek: Marker Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
2. Black Mingo Creek: Marker Overview
~ to the Patriot cause in eastern South Carolina.
 
Erected 2012 by Francis Marion Trail Commission of Francis Marion University.
 
Location. 33° 37.288′ N, 79° 25.947′ W. Marker is near Rhems, South Carolina, in Georgetown County. Marker can be reached from South Carolina Route 41. Click for map. At the boat landing near the bridge over Black Mingo Creek. There is a state marker for the Battle of Black Mingo across from the boat ramp access. Marker is in this post office area: Georgetown SC 29440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Skirmish At Black Mingo Creek (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Black Mingo – Willtown / Black Mingo Baptist Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Black Mingo Presbyterian Meeting House (approx. 1.4 miles away); Birthplace of Jeremiah John Snow / China Grove Plantation (approx. 1.5 miles away); Benjamin Britton Chandler (1854–1925) (approx. 4.8 miles away); Pleasant Hill School (approx. 5.6 miles away); Pleasant Hill Baptist Church (approx. 5.6 miles away); Prince George Winyah Parish / Prince Frederick’s Parish (approx. 6.5 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Picture of Francis Marion on "Ball" on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
3. Picture of Francis Marion on "Ball" on the marker
After the Battle of Black Mingo, Francis Marion claimed the defeated Capt. Ball’s fine horse. Marion named him “Ball” to spite his opponent and rode him proudly until the end of the war.
View of the Bridge over Black Mingo Creek from the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
4. View of the Bridge over Black Mingo Creek from the marker
Map on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
5. Map on the marker
The locations of the colonial settlement of Willtown and of Sheppard’s Ferry across Black Mingo Creek, depicted in Mills‘ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (1825).
Picture on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
6. Picture on the marker
Musket and rifle balls recovered from the Black Mingo site during archaeological investigations in 2007.
Black Mingo Creek: Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
7. Black Mingo Creek: Marker
Across Black Mingo Creek was the site of a Revolutionary War Port and Crossing that was called Shepard's Ferry.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,499 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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