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Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Confederate Defenders of Charleston

Fort Sumter 1861-1865

 
 
Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker southeast view image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2005
1. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker southeast view
left hand points towards the sea to the enemy, shield bearing the South Carolina state seal
Inscription.
To The
Confederate
Defenders Of
Charleston

Fort Sumter
1861-1865

(Around bottom of base:)
Count Them Happy Who For Their Faith And Their Courage Endured A Great Fight
 
Erected 1932 by Charleston Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.165′ N, 79° 55.743′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Murray Boulevard and East Battery, on the right when traveling west on Murray Boulevard. Click for map. White Point Garden. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Charleston Waterfront (within shouting distance of this marker); Seven - Inch Banded Brooks Rifle (within shouting distance of this marker); Ten - Inch Smooth Bore Columbaid Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker); Moultrie (within shouting distance of this marker); Thirteen - Inch Mortar
Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker, northeast face image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
2. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker, northeast face
relief of figures repairing the shattered walls of Fort Sumter with sand bags.
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Thirteen - Inch Mortar (within shouting distance of this marker); William Gilmore Simms (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Ten - Inch Smooth Bore Columbaid Cannon (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding Confederate Defenders of Charleston. Dimensions: Sculpture: approx. H. 12 ft. x W. 5 ft. x Diam. 5 ft.; Base: approx. H. 13 ft. x Diam. 50 ft.
This monument to the Confederate defenders of Charleston, South Carolina, was erected with the major portion of a $100,000 bequest of Andrew Buist Murray. The artist was Hermon A. MacNeil, 1866-1947, sculptor. Dawson Engineering Company set the base. IAS files contain copy of newspaper article from the Post-Courier (Charleston, SC), Sept. 21, 1977; and copy from a book entitled "The Battery, Charleston, S.C.," pg. 35.
 
Also see . . .  Siege of Charleston Harbor, Wikipedia entry. The Second Battle of Charleston Harbor (or the Siege of Charleston Harbor, Siege of Fort Wagner, or Battle of Morris Island)
Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker , northwest face image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
3. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker , northwest face
(Submitted on May 18, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Monument
[O]n October 20, 1932, the people of Charleston (eight thousand in attendance) dedicated a monument at White Point Gardens, the Battery, to the Confederate defenders of Fort Sumter...Many present had fathers, uncles, and grandfathers who had fought in what many still called "the Confederate War." The sculptor Herman A. MacNeil said of the monument:

"Its motif in brief, is that the stalwart youth, standing in front with sword and shield symbolizes by his attitude the defense not only of the fort, but also of the fair city behind the fort in which are his most prized possessions, wife and family. And she, the wife, glorified into an Athena-like woman, unafraid, stands behind him with arms outstretched toward the fort, this creating an inseparable union of the city and Fort Sumter."

[T]he last Confederate veteran of Fort Sumter living in Charleston in 1932, Colonel William Robert Greer, attended the ceremony. He described the heroic defense of the fort and praised Andrew B. Murray, the philanthropist who bequeathed $100,000 to the city to help fund the monument. There was never "at any time
Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker west face image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
4. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker west face
and lack of courage," Colonel Greer said, "but a determination unalterable that this great Gibraltar of Charleston should never be captured or surrendered...There were many flags shot down in the fort during the siege, but before the force embarked for the city the commander, the gallant and intrepid [Thomas A.] Huguenin, removed the standard and consigned it as a sacred relic to the care of the Sumter Guards, where it is held in prepetue with love and veneration."

The monument was unveiled by four young ladies, all descendants of members of the Confederate garrison of the fort:
  • the granddaughter of Colonel Alfred Rhett, the first commanding officer of Fort Sumter;
  • the granddaughter of Captain Thomas A. Huguenin, the last Confederate commander;
  • the grandniece of Major Stephen Elliott, second in Command under Colonel Rhett;
  • the granddaughter of Major John Johnson, a member of the Confederate Engineers and author of The Defense of Charleston Harbor.

    Two ushers placed on the monument the last Confederate flag which flew over Fort Sumter. "The young ladies," the News & Courier reported, "then placed on the base of the monument two wreaths of red and white carnations. (Source: Confederate Charleston: An Illustrated History of the City and the People by Robert N. Rosen, pg 158.)
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker with Memorial Wreath image. Click for full size.
    By Mike Stroud, May 12, 2009
    5. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker with Memorial Wreath
    Artist: MacNeil, Hermon A., 1866-1947, sculptor. Delano & Aldrich, architectural firm. Alexis Rudier Fondeur, founder. Dawson Engineering Company, engineering firm.
        — Submitted September 23, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

     
    Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
     
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Monument image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
    6. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Monument
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Monument image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
    7. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Monument
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Statue image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
    8. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Statue
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Statue<br>Note the Seal of South Carolina on the Shield image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
    9. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Statue
    Note the Seal of South Carolina on the Shield
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Statue<br>Looking West Across the Harbor<br>to Fort Sumter image. Click for full size.
    By Brian Scott, September 19, 2011
    10. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Statue
    Looking West Across the Harbor
    to Fort Sumter
    Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker, Murray Boulevard at East Battery image. Click for full size.
    By Mike Stroud, November 10, 2011
    11. Confederate Defenders of Charleston Marker, Murray Boulevard at East Battery
     
     
    Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 5,546 times since then and 24 times this year. Last updated on , by Spencer Means of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   11. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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