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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Marathon in Brewster County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Double Mills

 
 
Double Mills Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 22, 2012
1. Double Mills Marker
Inscription. A natural watering place in prehistoric time, as evidenced by artifacts found here. Used later by Indians and Spaniards on roads from northern Mexico.

As Maravillas Creek developed from a draw into water channel, old water hole vanished. About 1900 a rancher, George Miller, dug two wells and put up twin windmills. After that site was called Double Mills.

Became campsite for ranchers driving cattle and horses from Mexico or the Chisos Mountains to the railroad at Marathon. Also for wagon trains of ore; and for U.S. troops on border duty.
 
Erected 1967 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 1258.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Comanche Trail into Mexico marker series.
 
Location. 29° 44.569′ N, 103° 9.648′ W. Marker is in Marathon, Texas, in Brewster County. Marker is on U.S. 385, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located in small rest stop, on left, going south on 385. Marker is in this post office area: Marathon TX 79842, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Comanche Trail (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
Categories. AnthropologyHispanic AmericansNative Americans
 
Double Mills Marker in context image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 22, 2012
2. Double Mills Marker in context
Ruins of old windmill image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, March 22, 2012
3. Ruins of old windmill
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 469 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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