“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vancouver in Greater Vancouver Regional District, British Columbia — The Canadian Pacific


Sherman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 1, 2011
1. Sherman Marker
M4A3E8, Crew 5, Wt 32 tonnes, speed 48 km/hr armament - 76 mm main gun, 2 x 30 cal mg in service 1943-1970
On 8/9 August 1944, the British Columbia Regiment (Duke of Connaught's Own), then designated Canadian 28th Armoured Regiment, was commanded by LCOL D.G. Worthington in his tank "Boss". In Sherman tanks similar to this one, they fought a heroic 14 hour battle on Hill 140 north of the town of Falaise, France. When the battle ended the "Dukes" had suffered great losses, including their commanding officer, to overwhelming enemy fire. This tank is dedicated to the memory of all those who fought so gallantly on the hill to preserve our peace and freedom.
Location. 49° 16.775′ N, 123° 6.646′ W. Marker is in Vancouver, British Columbia, in Greater Vancouver Regional District. Marker is at the intersection of Beatty Street and Dunsmuir Street, on the right when traveling north on Beatty Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 620 Beatty Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 2L9, Canada.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 64 Pounder Guns (here, next to this marker); Drill Hall (a few steps from this marker); Ram Mk II (within shouting distance
Sherman Tank and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 1, 2011
2. Sherman Tank and Marker
The marker is just visible here, mounted on the side of the tank, below the turret.
of this marker); 326 West Pender Street (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); BC Permanent Building (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Flack Block (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Here Stood Hamilton (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Dominion Building (approx. 0.4 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in Vancouver.
Also see . . .
1. The Second World War, 1939-1945. The British Columbia Regiment's history. On the foe the Regiment faced on Hill 140, "... Fatefully, Worthington Force chose to defend high ground that was also assigned to a battle group of the 12 SS Panzer Division, consisting of a Panther tank battalion and a Panzer Grenadier infantry battalion. That German battle group was about to move onto the position when they got word that an Allied armoured force, Worthington Force, had beat them to it! That German battle group, reinforced by Tiger tanks from the famous 101st SS Heavy Tank Battalion, were the forces that the Dukes and Algonquians fought that day, along with troops from the 85th Infantry Division moving up from the south." (Submitted on March 28, 2012.) 

2. BCR - World War Two
Sherman Tank and Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 1, 2011
3. Sherman Tank and Marker - wide view
The tank upon which the marker is mounted is just visible here behind the bus. The tank is parked in front of the Drill Hall Armoury.
. The Canadian Armed Forces' history of the British Columbia Regiment in World War II. On the battle on Hill 140, "... One by one the tanks were knocked out, with the surviving crews retrieving weapons from their burning vehicles and carried on the fight. Later that morning, Col. May of the Algonquins was severely wounded whilst discussing the situation with Col. Worthington. Lieut.-Col. Worthington and all of the Squadron commanders were killed in the fighting, and after fighting for 14 hours after being surrounded by the Germans, the survivors fought their way through the Germans. 48 out of 52 tanks had been destroyed and the Regiment received 133 casualties, which was its highest single loss during the war. To the credit of Lieut.-Col. Worthington and his men, they fought bravely, with no consideration or discussion of surrender in the face of overwhelming odds." (Submitted on March 28, 2012.) 
Categories. War, World II
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 519 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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