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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Waverly

 
 
Waverly Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 28, 2012
1. Waverly Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
Waverly has been one of Columbia’s most significant black communities since the 1930s. The city’s first residential suburb, it grew out of a 60-acre parcel bought by Robert Latta in 1855. Latta’s widow and children sold the first lots here in 1863. Shortly after the Civil War banker and textile manufacturer Lysander D. Childs bought several blocks here for development. Waverly grew for the next 50 years as railroad and streetcar lines encouraged growth.
(Reverse text)
The City of Columbia annexed Waverly in 1913. Two black colleges, Benedict College and Allen University, drew many African Americans to this area as whites moved to other city suburbs. By the 1930s this community was almost entirely black. The Waverly Historic District, bounded by Gervais, Harden, and Taylor Streets and Millwood Avenue, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.
 
Erected 2012 by The Historic Columbia Foundation, the City of Columbia, and the S.C. Department of Transportatio,. (Marker Number 40-157.)
 
Location. 34° 0.585′ N, 81° 1.238′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is at the intersection of Harden Street and Hampton Street, on
Waverly Marker, rear text image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 28, 2012
2. Waverly Marker, rear text
the right when traveling north on Harden Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Lighthouse & Informer / John H. McCray (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Allen University (about 300 feet away); Carver Theatre (about 400 feet away); Visanska-Starks House (about 700 feet away); Matthew J. Perry House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Benedict College (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fair-Rutherford House / Rutherford House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Harden Street (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Columbia.
 
More about this marker. Although Printed and casted as 2011, the marker was erected in 2012
 
Regarding Waverly. National Register Properties in South Carolina
Waverly Historic District (added 1989 - - #89002154)
♦ Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event
♦ Architect, builder, or engineer: Lankford,John Anderson, Wilson,Charles Coker
♦ Architectural Style: Late 19th And Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals
♦ Area of Significance: Education, Architecture, Black, Social History
♦ Period of Significance:
Waverly Marker, looking South along Harden Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 28, 2012
3. Waverly Marker, looking South along Harden Street
1925-1949, 1900-1924, 1875-1899
♦ Historic Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Education, Health Care
♦ Current Function: Commerce/Trade, Domestic, Education, Health Care

The Waverly Historic District is significant as Columbia’s first suburb. The historic core of the Waverly neighborhood was originally an early subdivision of an antebellum plantation by the same name located on the outskirts of Columbia. By the early twentieth century, it had evolved into a community of African American artisans, professionals
and social reformers, many of whom made significant contributions to the social and political advancement of African Americans in Columbia and South Carolina. Originally a predominantly white neighborhood, Waverly’s development illustrates important patterns in the shift from biracial coexistence in the late nineteenth century to the practice of strict racial segregation common to early twentieth century urban centers. Waverly’s public institutions and other historic resources are also significant for their associations with individuals who played an active role in the Civil Rights Movement. The Waverly Historic District has a high concentration of vernacular residential, academic, and religious buildings reflecting a range of architectural characteristics of the late nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries. Representative styles
Overview looking north along Harden Street image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 28, 2012
4. Overview looking north along Harden Street
and forms include Queen Anne, Four-Square, Craftsman, Bungalow,
Shotgun, Colonial Revival, and Neo-Classical. The majority of the 192 properties in the neighborhood, 137 of which are contributing, were built between ca. 1898 and ca. 1925. Listed in the National Register December 21, 1989.
(South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
 
Categories. African AmericansEducationIndustry & Commerce
 
Waverly Community Sign image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 28, 2012
5. Waverly Community Sign
This flourishing community is proud of its heritage.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 423 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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