Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Niagara-on-the-Lake in Niagara Region, Ontario — Central Canada
 

Niagara National Historic Sites

 
 
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
1. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Inscription.
Brock's Monument and
Queenston Heights:

This striking commemoration and final resting place of Major General Brock marks the site of the Battle of Queenston Heights. Visitors can climb the 235 stairs to take in spectacular views, or set off on a self-guided tour which covers every major scene of the historic battle

Navy Hall

Navy Hall survives as the last building of what was once a large military complex and key supply depot for British forts on the Upper Great Lakes. Constructed in the 1760's the navy Hall complex has been home to Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe, the Provincial Marine, and a mess for the officers of Fort George. Open by appointment year-round.

Butler's Barracks

Just a ten minute walk from Fort George along the Otter Trail, this site has been more than 170 years of continuous military occupation. Begun as a British Army depot sited out of cannon range from the United States, the site became a Canadian Militia training camp. Many Canadians who fought in the Boer War, World War I, World War II and Korea, trained here. The grounds are open year-round. Visitor facilities will be available at this site in 1999.

Fort Mississauga

Built by the
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
2. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of the text on the historical marker that discusses the Brock Monument and Queenston Heights.
British toward the end of the 1812 conflict, this star-shaped fortification was intended to provide additional protection at the mouth of the Niagara River. It also counter balances Fort Niagara on the American shore opposite. While the remains of the fort have been stabilized to ensure its preservation, no visitor programmes or facilities are available at this time.
 
Erected by Canadian Heritage Parks Canada.
 
Location. 43° 15.107′ N, 79° 3.814′ W. Marker is in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, in Niagara Region. Marker can be reached from Queens Parade just from Wellington Street. Click for map. This historic marker is located on the grounds of a national historic park. On the map this historic marker appears to be near the end of Bryon Street, but in order to see this historic marker one should probably pull into the parking lot of the national park, which is just off of the roadway called the Queens Parade. Once you park your vehicle the historical marker is just a short walk away along the pathway that leads to the Fort George's visitor center. Marker is in this post office area: Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario L0S 1J0, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome to Fort George (here, next to this marker); Fort George
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
3. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of both the text regarding the Brock Monument and of the illustration of the Brock Monument.
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Fortified Mouth of the Niagara River (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); A Strategic Site (about 120 meters away); Fort Niagara (about 120 meters away); Ubique (about 150 meters away); Six Pounder Field Gun (about 150 meters away); Guns Gins and Devil Carts (about 150 meters away). Click for a list of all markers in Niagara-on-the-Lake.
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesWar of 1812
 
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
4. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of the text on the historical marker that discusses the Navy Hall.
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
5. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of both the text regarding the Navy Hall and of the illustration of the Navy Hall.
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
6. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of the text on the historical marker that discusses the Butler's Barracks.
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
7. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of both the text regarding the Navy Hall and of the illustration of the Butler's Barracks.
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
8. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of the text on the historical marker that discusses Fort Mississauga.
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
9. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
Close-up view of both the text regarding Fort Mississauga and of the illustration of Fort Mississauga.
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
10. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
View of the historical marker situated along the pathway that leads from the Fort George parking lot (seen in the background) to Fort George (located in the opposite direction).
Niagara National Historic Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2011
11. Niagara National Historic Sites Marker
View of a nearby display showing an overhead illustration of Fort George, and this historical marker would be on the outside of the front entrance to the fort, just beyond the visitor center.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 514 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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