Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence

c. 1850; moved 1901, 1912

 
 
Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, April 6, 2012
1. Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence Marker
Inscription. These vernacular buildings are significant for their association with, and are among the last vestiges of, Madison's first African-American community. Both were moved to the site by African-American civic leader, John Turner. The two-story, gable-front building was moved in 1901 to provide a meeting place for the Douglass Beneficial Society and later adapted for use as a grocery by Rev. C. Thomas. The 1 ½ story house was moved in 1912 as the parsonage for the St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1917 both were sold to John W. Hill who continued to operate the grocery store until c. 1980.

Designated July 16, 1991
 
Erected 2012 by the Madison Landmarks Commission. (Marker Number 96.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin, Madison Landmarks Commission marker series.
 
Location. 43° 4.868′ N, 89° 22.736′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is at the intersection of East Dayton Street and North Blount Street on East Dayton Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 649 East Dayton Street, Madison WI 53703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Here was Madisonís first African-American neighborhood
Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, April 6, 2012
2. Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence Marker
The marker is on the ground to the left of the steps.
(here, next to this marker); Miller House (a few steps from this marker); Badger State Shoe Factory (within shouting distance of this marker); City Horse Barn (within shouting distance of this marker); City Market (within shouting distance of this marker); Ceramic Arts Studio of Madison (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing); Anna and Cornelius Collins Residence (about 700 feet away); Irene and Robert Connor Residence (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Madison.
 
Also see . . .  Madison Landmarks Commission. The landmark nomination form for the buildings (pdf). (Submitted on April 7, 2012, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.
 
John Hill in front of his grocery store image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 4, 2010
3. John Hill in front of his grocery store
This photo is on the nearby "Here was Madison's first African-American neighborhood" marker.
Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 4, 2010
4. Thomas / Hill Grocery and Residence
The Thomas / Hill house is just behind the nearby "Here was Madison's first African-American neighborhood" marker in the foreground, with the former Hill's Grocery building attached on the right. The Miller house, with its own marker, is just beyond the former Hill's Grocery building.
Hill's Grocery Store Building image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 4, 2010
5. Hill's Grocery Store Building
Hill's Grocery image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, July 4, 2010
6. Hill's Grocery
The windows to the right of the front door of the former Hill's Grocery building still bear the name as seen in photo no. 3 above.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 368 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement