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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lancaster in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

James Buchanan Home

 
 
James Buchanan Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
1. James Buchanan Home Marker


Inscription.
has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark

Under the provisions of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935
this site possesses exceptional value
in commemorating and illustrating
the history of the United States.

U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service

1961

 
Erected 1961 by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 40° 2.596′ N, 76° 19.848′ W. Marker is in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in Lancaster County. Marker is at the intersection of Marietta Avenue (Pennsylvania Route 23) and N President Avenue, on the right when traveling east on Marietta Avenue. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1120 Marietta Ave., Lancaster PA 17603, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Smokehouse / Icehouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Privy (within shouting distance of this marker); Ambulance Co. No. 111 † 28th Division A.E.F. (approx. 0.4 miles away); James Tilden Sheckard (approx. half
James Buchanan Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
2. James Buchanan Home Marker
a mile away); U.S.S. Maine Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Leo F. Hauck (approx. half a mile away); James Buchanan (approx. half a mile away); Wheatland (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Lancaster.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wheatland. National Park Service website. (Submitted on April 12, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. President James Buchananís Wheatland. LancasterHistory.org website. (Submitted on April 12, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Wheatland - James Buchanan Home image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
3. Wheatland - James Buchanan Home
The marker can be seen next to the door on the right.
James Buchanan Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
4. James Buchanan Home Marker
This sign near the street identifies Wheatland, the Home of President James Buchanan. Buchanan's home can be seen in the background.
Parlor of James Buchanan's Home image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
5. Parlor of James Buchanan's Home
President Buchanan's portrait can be seen above the fireplace in this photo.
James Buchanan's Study image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
6. James Buchanan's Study
President Buchanan did much of his official work in this room. He met with many officials and heads of state here.
James Buchanan's Bedroom image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2012
7. James Buchanan's Bedroom
James Buchanan died in this bedroom on on June 1, 1868. His wake, which took place at the house, was attended by 20,000 people.
James Buchanan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
8. James Buchanan
This 1859 portrait of James Buchanan hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“James Buchanan entered the White House in 1857 hoping to quell the mounting sectional rancor over slavery. But the events of his administration often had the opposite effect. The Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, which denied Congress's power to ban slavery in the western territories, unleashed an unprecedented wave of anger in the North. When Buchanan supported proslavery forces in the Kansas Territory, that anger rose to a fever pitch. In response, the south's militance in defending slavery waxed ever stronger, and by the end of Buchanan's term, the long-feared specter of war was turning into a reality.

With the outbreak of hostilities in the spring of 1861, Buchanan became the object of vilification in many quarters. Among the milder expressions of antiBuchanan feeling was the disposition of the version of this portrait that had been painted for the White House. When artist George Healy presented his bill for the picture, Congress refused to pay it, and many years passed before the White House acquired a portrait of Buchanan.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 395 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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