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Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Point of Honor

Spies in Lynchburg

 
 
Point of Honor CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 12, 2012
1. Point of Honor CWT Marker
Inscription. Col. Robert Owen, president of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, owned Point of Honor during the war. This railroad, one of three that served Lynchburg, transported thousands of Confederate troops as well as wounded, supplies, prisoners of war, and refugees. It connected Lynchburg to Bristol, Tennessee, where it joined other southern railroads, and formed a strategically vital western supply lifeline for Gen. Robert E. Leeís Army of Northern Virginia. The tracks here ran along Blackwater Creek in the va1ley west of this location.

Owenís wife, Narcissa, was the daughter of a Cherokee chief. She headed the local Soldiers Aid Society that made uniforms, knapsacks, and other items for Confederate soldiers. Before the Battle of Lynchburg, two men calling themselves Confederates appeared at Point of Honor asking for food. Narcissa Owen told them that there were 20,000 Confederates in the city to boost their morale, and that they would “give the Yanks fits” in the morning. The men, however, were really Union Gen. David Hunterís spies, and her exaggeration may have helped convince Hunter to retreat on June 18. In Kansas after the war, Owen first learned from her housekeeper that the men were Union spies—one of them the housekeeperís father.

(sidebar)
On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter
Point of Honor CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 12, 2012
2. Point of Honor CWT Marker
marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to dive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy transportation facilities at Lynchburg. His raid was part of Gen. Ulysses S. Grantís strategy to attack Confederates simultaneously throughout Virginia. After defeating Gen. William E. “Grumble” Jones at Piedmont on June 5, Hunter marched to Lexington, burned Virginia Military Institute, and headed to Lynchburg. Here, on June 17-18, Gen. Jubal A. Early repulsed Hunter and pursued him to West Virginia. Early then turned north in July to threaten Washington.

(sidebar)
Built by Dr. George Cabell, Sr., in 1815, this refined, Federal-style dwelling is stylistically linked to houses in Richmond. The source of the name is not known, but local legend suggests that duels were fought here. Cabell owned vast properties in Virginia, including this 737-acre plantation and a nearby tobacco warehouse where batteaux were loaded and goods shipped to Richmond on the James River. Point of Honor was restored and opened to the public in 1977 as part of the Lynchburg Museum System. All photographs are courtesy of Lynchburg Museum System
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 37° 25.243′ N, 79° 8.591′ 
Point of Honor image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 12, 2012
3. Point of Honor
W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Norwood Street and A Street, on the right when traveling north on Norwood Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 112 Cabell Street, Lynchburg VA 24504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Allen Weir Freeman, M.D. (approx. 0.2 miles away); Douglas Southall Freeman (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lynchburg History (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Lynchburg History (approx. ľ mile away); Williams Viaduct (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Point of Honor (approx. 0.3 miles away); Court Street Baptist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Amherst County / Campbell County (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is an "Early photo of Point of Honor". On the right are portraits of "Robert Owen" & "Narcissa Owen". On the lower right is a map of Hunter's Raid.
 
Also see . . .
1. Southside Virginia Civil War - Lynchburg. Virginia Civil War Trails (Submitted on April 13, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Point of Honor, Lynchburg, Virginia. (Submitted on April 13, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 436 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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