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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rockford in Surry County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Rockford

A Close Encounter

 

—Stoneman's Raid —

 
Rockford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
1. Rockford Marker
Inscription. (Preface):
On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, the North Carolina Railroad, and the Piedmont Railroad. He struck at Boone on March 28, headed into Virginia on April 2, and returned to North Carolina a week later. Stoneman's Raid ended at Asheville on April 26, the day that Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered to Union Gen. William T. Sherman near Durham.
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Union Gen. George Stoneman's raiders passed through this area along the north bank of the Yadkin River on April 1-2, 1865, on their way north to Virginia. As they rode through Rockford, they stopped here at Mark York's tavern, a Federal-style building constructed about 1830. According to local tradition, York's wife was churning butter in the front yard with her young son, Jasper, at her side. The troopers demanded that she reveal where local residents had hidden animals and valuables when they learned of the raiders' approach. She refused to answer, even after the Federals threatened to take her son away with them, but finally retorted, "And you'll pay the devil." The soldiers gave up and left, and she returned to her churning.

When a Federal
Rockford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
2. Rockford Marker
officer fell ill near here, he sent a courier to summon Dr. Milton Folger, a Rockford resident, to care for him. Folger's six-year-old daughter Molly later recalled that while her father assembled his kit and prepared to depart, she sat on the Union cavalryman's knee and listened to his description of his own little girl. When the trooper and Folger rode away, the doctor was riding his good horse. When he returned after treating the officer, however, he was astride a broken-down cavalry mount.

Stoneman's raiders continued riding down the north bank of the Yadkin River. They had a brief encounter with Confederate troops at Siloam, about five miles east of here, before turning north toward Virginia.
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(Inset):
In 1789, Rockford became the seat of Surry County and flourished as a governmental and trade community on the Yadkin River. After Yadkin County was created from the southern half of Surry in 1850, the court was moved to Dobson three years later, and Rockford entered a period of decline.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 16.19′ N, 80° 38.97′ W. Marker is in Rockford, North Carolina, in Surry County
Rockford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
3. Rockford Marker
. Marker is on Rockford Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Dobson NC 27017, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Richmond Hill (approx. 2 miles away); a different marker also named Richmond Hill (approx. 2 miles away); Richmond Pearson (approx. 4.4 miles away); Reeves Homeplace (approx. 5.2 miles away); Deep Creek Friends Meeting (approx. 6.1 miles away); Bond Schoolhouse (approx. 6.1 miles away); Bond School House (approx. 6.1 miles away); Second Yadkin County Jail (approx. 9.3 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Dr. Milton Folger image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
4. Dr. Milton Folger
Foragers image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
5. Foragers
Federal foragers routinely seized civilian livestock, weapons, food-stuffs, and other items to supply their men or deny them to Confederate soldiers. Frequently, however, they took nonmilitary personal propert as well.
Rockford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
6. Rockford Marker
Rockford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
7. Rockford Marker
Civil War Trails sign on Rockford Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, April 17, 2012
8. Civil War Trails sign on Rockford Rd.
Marker is barely discernable in the background behind the Rockford sign.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 408 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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