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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Camden in Kershaw County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Monroe Boykin Park

 
 
Monroe Boykin Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
1. Monroe Boykin Park Marker
Inscription. (Front)

In the 1798 city plan, this five-acre park was laid out as a public square. In 1900 the Seaboard Air Line Railway built a passenger depot next to it, on the SW corner of Chesnut & Gordon Sts. The city beautified the square to welcome visitors and named it Seaboard Park. After the depot moved in 1937, the area near it was named Seaboard Park. The present name, first given to an African-American suburb absorbed into Kirkwood, honors Rev. Monroe Boykin.

(Reverse)

Rev. Monroe Boykin (d. 1904), born into slavery, became a community leader after the Civil War. After emancipation he was given two tracts of land nearby by the heirs of his former owner. In 1866 Boykin and other freedmen withdrew from Camden (First) Baptist Church to form Mount Moriah Baptist Church on Broad St. Boykin, its first pastor, served there for 34 years. He helped found many churches in Kershaw, Clarendon, Sumter, and Lancaster Counties.
 
Erected 2012 by City Camden. (Marker Number 28-17.)
 
Location. 34° 15.349′ N, 80° 36.742′ W. Marker is in Camden, South Carolina, in Kershaw County. Marker is on Campbell Street just south of Chesnut Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Camden SC 29020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Monroe Boykin Park Marker Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
2. Monroe Boykin Park Marker Reverse
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. James Polk Dickinson (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Americans Return (approx. 0.4 miles away); Confederate War Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Camden (approx. 0.4 miles away); In Honor and Rememberance (approx. 0.4 miles away); Action at Logtown (approx. 0.4 miles away); Pantheon (approx. half a mile away); The Bishop Davis House (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Camden.
 
More about this marker. Although the marker is cast as erected in 2011, it was not installed and unveiled until April 17, 2012.
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.
 
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
3. Overview
Monroe Boykin Park image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
4. Monroe Boykin Park
Mt Moriah Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
5. Mt Moriah Baptist Church
Founded by Rev. Boykin as mentioned on the marker
Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
6. Cornerstone
Mt. Moriah Bapt. Church. Rev Monroe Boykin Pastor 1891
Monument in front of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
7. Monument in front of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church
Monument in front of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
8. Monument in front of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church
Rev. Monroe Boykin Born in Kershaw Co. S.C. March 1819; Died Dec. 1, 1904. A loving father, loyal citizen and faithful minister of the Gospel.
Monument in front of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church - side image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
9. Monument in front of Mt. Moriah Baptist Church - side
Erected by his white and colored friends, The Wateree Baptist Association of which he was moderator 23 years, and the Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, which he pastored 26 years. "Servant of God, Well done."
Mt Moriah Baptist Church Sign image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, April 20, 2012
10. Mt Moriah Baptist Church Sign
Plaque at the bottom: In memory of Deacon Tommy Carter The Children
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 805 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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