Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clemson in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Hopewell Treaty Site

The Hatchet Shall be Buried

 
 
Hopewell Treaty Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
1. Hopewell Treaty Site Marker
Inscription.
The Hopewell Treaties were the first formal treaties after the battles between the United States and the Southern Native American tribes. Gen. Andrew Pickens, also known as "Skyagunsta" or "Border Wizard Owl," negotiated the treaties with Benjamin Hawkins, Joseph Martin and Lachlan McIntosh.

The Hopewell Treaties opened up western territories to settlement, provided for prisoner exchanges, established boundaries, and facilitated peace and perpetual friendship between the two sides.

The Cherokee negotiations took place with Great Chief Corn Tassel; 36 other chiefs; and nearly 1,000 men, women and children -- including Nanye-hi (aka Nancy Ward), a beloved Cherokee woman -- under Treaty Oak on the Hopewell property. The treaty was signed on November 28, 1785. The Choctaw treaty was signed January 3, 1786 with Chief Yockenahoma and 30 other chiefs. The Chickasaw treaty was last, concluding several days later on January 10 with Chief Head Warrior Piomingo, who shared white beads as a token of peace and friendship.

Each treaty ended with the same sentence. It begins, "The hatchet shall be forever buried, and peace given by the United States of America."
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina Heritage Corridor marker series.
 
Location.
Hopewell Treaty Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
2. Hopewell Treaty Site Marker
34° 39.367′ N, 82° 50.517′ W. Marker is in Clemson, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from West Cherry Road (State Highway S39-149). Click for map. Marker is located at the end of a trail about 1/4 mile from the Hopewell roadside marker. Marker is in this post office area: Pickens SC 29671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hopewell, Keowee (here, next to this marker); Hopewell Plantation (approx. 0.3 miles away); Hopewell / Hopewell Indian Treaties (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Battle Of Seneca Town / Fort Rutledge (approx. ¾ mile away); Site of Fort Rutledge (approx. one mile away); "Widowmaker’s” Drill (approx. 1.2 miles away); Asbury F. Lever (approx. 1.4 miles away); Calhoun Plantation Cemetery (approx. 1.4 miles away); Outdoor Theater (Amphitheater) (approx. 1.5 miles away); Fort Hill (approx. 1.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Clemson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Treaty of Hopewell. The Treaty of Hopewell may refer to one of three different treaties signed at Hopewell, (the plantation of Andrew Pickens on the Seneca River in northwestern South Carolina) between the United States of America and Cherokee (1785), Choctaw and Chickasaw (1786) indigenous nations. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Hopewell Treaty Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
3. Hopewell Treaty Site Marker
 

2. Cherokee Treaty of 1785. Articles concluded at Hopewell, on the Keowee, between Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, Joseph Martin, and Lachlan McIntosh, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one Part, and the Head-Men and Warriors of all the Cherokees of the other. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Choctow Treaty of 1786. Articles of a treaty concluded at Hopewell, on the Keowee, near Seneca Old Town, between Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens and Joseph Martin, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one part; and of Yockonahoma, great Medal Chief of Soonacoha; Yockehoopoie, leading Chief of Bugtoogoloo; Mingo-hoopoie, leading Chief of Hashooqua; Tobocoh, great Medal Chief of Congetoo; Pooshemastubie, Gorget Captain of Senayazo; and thirteen small medal Chiefs of the first Class, twelve Medal and Gorget Captains, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of all the Choctaw Nation, of the other part. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Chickasaw Treaty of 1786. Articles of a treaty, concluded at Hopewell, on the Keowee, near Seneca Old Town, between Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, and Joseph Martin, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one Part;
Conditions of the Treaty image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
4. Conditions of the Treaty
1. Indians to restore prisoners. 2. Acknowledge the protection of United States. 3. Defined boundaries. 4. No citizen of United States shall settle on Indian lands, and Chickasaws may punish them as they please. 5. Indians to deliver up criminals. 6. Citizens of United States committing crimes against Indians to be punished. 7. Retaliation restrained. 8. United States to regulate trade. 9. Special provision for trade. 10. Indians to give notice of designs against United States. 11. Perpetual peace and friendship.
and Piomingo, Head Warrior and First Minister of the Chickasaw Nation; Mingatushka, one of the leading Chiefs; and; Latopoia, first beloved Man of the said Nation, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of all the Chickasaws, of the other Part. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Andrew Pickens. Andrew Pickens (September 13, 1739 – August 11, 1817) was a militia leader in the American Revolution and a member of the United States House of Representatives from South Carolina. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Benjamin Hawkins. Benjamin Hawkins (August 15, 1754 – June 6, 1816) was an American planter, statesman, and United States Indian agent. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Lachlan McIntosh. Lachlan McIntosh (March 17, 1725 – February 20, 1806) was a British-born American military and political leader during the American Revolution and the early United States. (Submitted on April 28, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Original Hopewell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
5. Original Hopewell Marker
Left: Known as "The Treaty Oak" this was the site where the Cherokee Treaty was negotiated. The Treaty Oak is no longer living. Right: The site of the negotiation of the Cherokee Treaty is marked today by this stone and is protected by a wrought iron fence.
Hopewell Treaty Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
6. Hopewell Treaty Site Marker
General Lachlan McIntosh image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
7. General Lachlan McIntosh
General Lachlan McIntosh was the son of the head of the Scottish McIntosh clan, for which McIntosh County in Georgia was named.
General Andrew Pickens image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
8. General Andrew Pickens
General Andrew Pickens was the father of 12 children, including South Carolina's 46th governor and was uncle of Floride Calhoun, U.S. Vice President John C. Calhoun's wife.
General Joseph Martin image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
9. General Joseph Martin
General Joseph Martin, Indian Agent for the Cherokee Nation. According to legend, Martin had up to five wives in his life -- two were white and three were Indian. Betsy Wide, Princess of the Cherokee Nation and daughter of Nancy Ward, was included in this list.
Colonel Benjamin Hawkins image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
10. Colonel Benjamin Hawkins
Colonel Benjamin Hawkins was agent for the Creek Nation and Superintendent of all tribes South of the Ohio River.
Hopewell Treaty Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
11. Hopewell Treaty Site Marker
Hopewell Treaty Trailhead image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
12. Hopewell Treaty Trailhead
Hopewell Treaty Marker (1976) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 23, 2012
13. Hopewell Treaty Marker (1976)
Located near the Heritage Corridor marker. This is a 1976 replacement to the original marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 675 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   11, 12. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement