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Chesapeake, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Marshall Family

 
 
The Marshall Family Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 28, 2012
1. The Marshall Family Marker
Inscription. The Thomas Marshall family lived in the backwoods of the Virginia frontier.

Thomas Marshall of Fauquier County served as a vestryman, High Sheriff, and member of the House of Burgesses. He was a close boyhood friend of George Washington, who helped him become a successful surveyor.

Marshall and his wife, Mary Randolph Keith, raised ten children in “The Hollow,” a 16 X 28 foot house with two rooms and a loft, which still stands today near Markham in northern Virginia. Mary was well educated, and together they provided an education for their children that was well beyond their meager means.

Thomas was a leader in organizing the Culpeper Minutemen in 1775. He was appointed major and was second in command of the minutemen force at Great Bridge.

Marshallís oldest son John was a lieutenant of the Culpeper Minutemen at age 19. He was at the Battle of Great Bridge and would later describe the battle in his five volume biography of George Washington, written while serving as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

John Marshallís biographer referred to the impact the battle had on the young lieutenant, writing, “The young soldier in this brief time saw a flash of the great truth that liberty can be made a reality and then possessed only by men who are strong,
Thamas Marsh (1730-1802) & Mary Randolph Keith Marshall (1737-1809) image. Click for full size.
April 28, 2012
2. Thamas Marsh (1730-1802) & Mary Randolph Keith Marshall (1737-1809)
courageous, unselfish, and wise enough to act unitedlyÖHe began to discern, though vaguely as yet, the supreme need of the organization of democracy.”

(sidebar)
A young servant of Major Thomas Marshall named William was reported to have deserted and informed Lord Dunmore that “not more than 300 shirt-men were here.” Historians debate whether he actually deserted or was “tutored” to mislead Dunmore. In either case, the Virginia Gazette reported that the misinformation was a factor that prompted Dunmore to order the attack on December 9th.
 
Erected 2012 by Great Bridge Battlefield & Waterways History Foundation.
 
Location. 36° 43.273′ N, 76° 14.372′ W. Marker is in Chesapeake, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of North Battlefield Boulevard (Business Virginia Route 168) and Watson Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Chesapeake VA 23320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Great Bridge Marshall Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Billy Flora (a few steps from this marker); Battle of Great Bridge DAR Monument (within shouting distance
John Marshall (1755-1835) image. Click for full size.
April 28, 2012
3. John Marshall (1755-1835)
of this marker); Planning a Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); The Day is Our Own! (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Murray (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of the Original Causeway (within shouting distance of this marker); Father & Son Canal Builders (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Chesapeake.
 
Also see . . .  Great Bridge Battlefield & Waterways History Foundation. (Submitted on April 29, 2012, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismPoliticsWar, US Revolutionary
 
An artistís conception of the young servant speaking with a British agent. image. Click for full size.
April 28, 2012
4. An artistís conception of the young servant speaking with a British agent.
The Marshall Family Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, April 28, 2012
5. The Marshall Family Marker
The Hollow (1763 or 64) image. Click for full size.
By PaulwC3, April 1, 2013
6. The Hollow (1763 or 64)
The recently restored boyhood home of John Marshall is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (2004) and is located within the John Marshall Leeds Manor Rural Historic District.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 600 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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