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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Welshpool in Charlotte County, New Brunswick — The Canadian Atlantic
 

Lubec, Maine

 
 
Lubec, Maine Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 23, 2011
1. Lubec, Maine Marker
Inscription.
About 1840, a canal connecting Johnson and South Bays was dug in North Lubec and a dam constructed there to harness tidal energy to power plaster mills. Gypsum (the raw product used to make plaster) and grindstones from the Maritimes were important trade goods. Lubecís mills manufactured plaster as late as 1858. In 1874, shipping traffic to and from Lubec was so extensive that the U.S. Coast Guard constructed a life-saving station at West Quoddy Head.

About that time, passenger ferries carried their fares around the bay between the communities of Lubec, Eastport, North Lubec, and Welshpool. One of the later ferries had a capacity of 350 passengers and made trips to Deer Island, St. Andrews, St. Stephen, and Calais.

The smoked herring industry prospered until about 1870 when it gradually began to decline, paving the way for a new industry. Lubecís first sardine cannery was built in 1880, and in 1890, the height of the industry, 22 sardine canneries, a fertilizer plant, and a can-manufacturing plant were operating in various parts of the town. Canneries carried imaginative names like the Penny Catcher, Honey Pot, Salve Box, Drunkardís Dream, and Battle Axe. The townís population was 3,005, and families came from towns up to 129 kilometres (80 miles) away to spend the season working in the factories or at factory-related
Lubec, Maine Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 23, 2011
2. Lubec, Maine Marker
Left marker, with Lubec in background, across Lubec Narrows
jobs.

The shipbuilding, shipping, smoked herring, and sardine years were prosperous years in Lubec. Home and business construction boomed and rural areas benefited by supplying lumber, stakes for herring weirs, crops, dairy products, livestock, and fish.

With the advent of steam power in the 1880s, the sailing trade and its related shipbuilding began to decline. Side-wheel and eventually propeller-driven steamers traveled three times a week between Boston, Portland, Lubec, and Saint John. Sardines, smoked herring, and potatoes were shipped from Lubec and mustard, oil, tin, general cargo, and passengers were off-loaded at the townís piers.

In 1898, the Electrolytic Marine Salts Company came to town, perpetuating a hoax by claiming the “accumulators” at their two North Lubec factories could extract gold from seawater. Before the hoax was discovered, many shares of company stock were sold to prosperous investors from southern New England.

American engineer Dexter Cooper, in 1919, proposed his first of several plans to capture energy stored in Passamaquoddy Bayís tides. Franklin D. Roosevelt was a strong proponent of tidal power and the U.S. Corps of Army Engineers began dam construction in 1935. Although the Engineers completed two small dams in Eastport and a portion of a third of Lubec, Congress failed to appropriate additional funds
Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
3. Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker
U.S. Coast Guard life-saving Station at West Quoddy Head
and the project was abandoned in 1936.

The smoked herring and sardine canning industries are now absent from Lubecís shores, with the last sardine cannery closing in 2001. Fishing – including aquaculture and the harvesting of lobster, scallops, clams, sea urchins, and sea cucumbers – remains an important local industry. Lubec families also find employment in tourism, health care, and small entrepreneurial businesses. Seasonal occupations such as blueberry-raking and gathering fir boughs for Christmas wreaths also contribute to the local economy.
——————
Photos courtesy Lubec Historical Society, Bev Trenholm, Pauline Bailey, and Edith Comstock. Historical resources: Lubec Herald and 200 Years of Lubec History.
 
Erected by Roosevelt Campobello International Park.
 
Location. 44° 51.785′ N, 66° 58.761′ W. Marker is near Welshpool, New Brunswick, in Charlotte County. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of Mulholland Point Lighthouse, off Narrows Road, and about 0.5 kilometers north of the FDR Memorial Bridge, in Roosevelt Campobello International Park. Marker is in this post office area: Welshpool, New Brunswick E5E 1A4, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Lubec, Maine
Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
4. Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker
Passenger ferries Lubec (left) and Campobello (right)
(here, next to this marker); Mulholland Point / La pointe Mulholland (a few steps from this marker); First Meeting Place of Washington Lodge No. 37 F.&A.M. (approx. 0.4 kilometers away in the U.S.); Civil War Memorial (approx. half a kilometer away in the U.S.); Lubec Veterans Honor Roll (approx. half a kilometer away in the U.S.); War Memorial (approx. half a kilometer away in the U.S.); Dawn's First Light Shines on Free Masonry (approx. half a kilometer away in the U.S.); Mulholland Point / La Pointe Mulholland (approx. 1.6 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in Welshpool.
 
More about this marker. An identical French-language marker is nearby.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lubec, Maine, Official Town Website. (Submitted on May 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Lubec, Maine, History. (Submitted on May 1, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
5. Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker
Sardine Canneries, North Lubec
Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
6. Photo on Lubec, Maine Marker
Water Street, Lubec
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 822 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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