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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Catonsville in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Catonsville

A Turnpike Town

 
 
The Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, February 18, 2008
1. The Marker
Inscription. This 1877 “Plan of Catonsville” lays outs all the possibilities of an energetic and emerging suburb of Baltimore, only eight miles, or a one-day carriage ride, to the east. The centerpiece of the town is the Frederick Turnpike, part of the road system that connected to the National Road in Cumberland.

Typical of many pike towns, the Plan shows that the majority of properties and buildings are directly adjacent to the road, thus making the Turnpike the hub of economic and social activities. Many of the more affluent residents, who enjoyed Catonsville as a retreat from the summer heat of Baltimore, built their estates a short distance from the Turnpike to allow for lawns, gardens and lavish Victorian-style homes.

(Sidebar):
Remus Adams Blacksmith Shop
Remus Adams, a “free man of color,” owned a blacksmith shop on the National Road before the Civil War. Today, his property has become the site of the Catonsville Elementary School.
 
Erected by America's Byways.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 16.308′ N, 76° 44.012′ W. Marker is in Catonsville, Maryland, in Baltimore
View from the marker, looking south image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, February 18, 2008
2. View from the marker, looking south
County. Marker is at the intersection of Frederick Road (Maryland Route 144) and Egges Lane on Frederick Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Catonsville MD 21228, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. This Memorial is Dedicated to all the Men and Women of the Catonsville area (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Castle Thunder (approx. 0.3 miles away); 6-Mile Marker on the National Road (approx. 0.4 miles away); Baltimore Regional Trail (approx. 0.4 miles away); Rolling Road (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Streetcar Era in Catonsville (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Catonsville (approx. 0.8 miles away); Old Salem Church and Graveyard (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Catonsville.
 
More about this marker. The center of the marker displays a plat of the town of Catonsville. In the sidebar is a photo of Remus Adams blacksmith shop. The background of the marker is "National Road at Fairview Inn" which is the standard for markers in this series. An elevation diagram of the national road is displayed on the bottom of the marker's face.
 
Also see . . .  Catonsville: A Turnpike Town. PDF version of the marker (Submitted on March 12, 2008, by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.) 
 
Additional comments.
The marker, as seen when travelling east. image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Busta-Peck, February 28, 2008
3. The marker, as seen when travelling east.

1. Eight miles, or a one day carriage ride
You say Catonsville was “only eight miles, or a one-day carriage ride” from Baltimore. Horses walk at 3 to 4 mph. That would make it a two hour to 2 hours 40 minutes carriage ride. Hardly a day’s ride.

I’ve heard it said that Frederick (40 miles away) was one day’s carriage ride out from Baltimore. 4 mph x 10 hours on the road.
    — Submitted February 18, 2008, by Peter Samuel of Frederick, Maryland.

2. Eight miles, or a one day carriage ride
A horse might have carried a rider at speed, but a carriage on a rutted and/or muddy road dodging livestock on their way to market might have traveled much more slowly on the average.
    — Submitted February 19, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.

 
Categories. African AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,228 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   3. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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