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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mary McLeod Bethune

 
 
Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
1. Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial
Inscription. 1875–1955 Let her works praise her.

I leave you love. • I leave you hope. • I leave you the challenge of developing confidence in one another. • I leave you a thirst for education. • I leave you a respect for the use of power. • I leave you faith. • I leave you racial dignity. • I leave you also a desire to live harmoniously with your fellow man. • I leave you finally a responsibility to our young people.
—Mary McLeod Bethune.
 
Erected 1974 by the National Council of Negro Women, Inc., Dorothy I. Height, President; July 10, 1974.
 
Location. 38° 53.389′ N, 76° 59.352′ W. Marker is in Capitol Hill, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on East Capitol Street near 13th Street, N.E.. Click for map. It is in Lincoln Park, a city square which is bounded by 11th and 13th Streets N.E., where North Carolina and Massachusetts Avenues cross, and Kentucky and Tennessee Avenues begin. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20003, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Freedmen’s Memorial Monument to Abraham Lincoln (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Eastern Market (approx. 0.4 miles away); Edge of the Row
Face of Pedestal image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
2. Face of Pedestal
The plaque reads “Erected July 10 1974 by the National Council of Negro Women, Inc., Dorothy I. Height, President.”
(approx. half a mile away); Healing the Wounded (approx. 0.6 miles away); Commerce and Community (approx. 0.6 miles away); Nathanael Greene Monument (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mediterranean Imports (approx. 0.6 miles away); Oldest Post of the Corps (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Capitol Hill.
 
More about this marker. The memorial is a large six-sided six-foot-tall pedestal on which the larger-than-life statues are mounted. Dr. Bethune’s quotes (from her Last Will and Testament) are cast on a single line on brass plaques along five sides of the pedestal.
 
Regarding Mary McLeod Bethune. This educator founded the Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls in Daytona Beach in 1904, now Bethune-Cookman College. She founded the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), the organization that erected this monument, in 1935.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mary McLeod Bethune. (Submitted on April 21, 2007.)
2. History of the National Council of Negro Women. (Submitted on April 21, 2007.)
Mary McLeod Bethune, by Robert Berks, Sculptor image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 21, 2007
3. Mary McLeod Bethune, by Robert Berks, Sculptor
She holds the cane given to her by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsEducationNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 8,518 times since then and 3 times this year. Last updated on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016.
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