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Gibson in Glascock County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Glascock County

 
 
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, June 13, 2012
1. Glascock County Marker
Inscription.
This County, created by Act of the Legislature Dec. 19, 1857, is named for Gen. Thomas Glascock who served in the War of 1812 and the Seminole War. He was a Speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives and a Member of Congress from 1835 to '39. Among the first County Officers were: Sheriff Augustus C. Reece, Ordinary Francis M. Kelly, Clerk of Superior Court Richard Walden, Clerk of Inferior Court Daniel Glover, Tax Receiver Abraham Brassell, Tax Collector Tobias Logue, Surveyor Seaborn Kitchens and Coroner Seaborn Glover.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 062-1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 13.997′ N, 82° 35.682′ W. Marker is in Gibson, Georgia, in Glascock County. Marker is at the intersection of East Main Street and Palmer Street, on the right when traveling east on East Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 62 East Main Street, Gibson GA 30810, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Glascock County Veterans Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Glascock County National Bicentennial Monument
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 26, 2015
2. Glascock County Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Calvin Logue Monument (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dr. Alexander Avera (approx. 4.8 miles away); Col. Robert M. Mitchell (approx. 6.3 miles away); Beall Springs (approx. 8.7 miles away); Shoals on the Ogeechee (approx. 9.4 miles away); Sylvan Grove (approx. 9.6 miles away); The March to the Sea (approx. 10.5 miles away); Early History of Warren County (approx. 12.6 miles away in South Carolina). Click for a list of all markers in Gibson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Glascock County. Glascock County was created from land that was previously part of Warren County by an act of the General Assembly, Glascock became Georgia’s 122 county on December 19, 1857. It was named for General Thomas Glascock (1791-1841) who fought in the War of 1812 and the Seminole War and later served in the Georgia Assembly and Congress. (Submitted on November 12, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Glascock County, Georgia.
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 26, 2015
3. Glascock County Marker
Glascock County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 3,082, making it the fourth-least populous county in Georgia. The county seat is Gibson. The county was created on December 19, 1857. (Submitted on November 12, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Thomas Glascock. Thomas Glascock Jr. (October 21, 1790 – May 19, 1841) was an American politician, soldier and lawyer. Glascock was born in Augusta, Georgia. He studied law, gained admission to the state bar, and began practicing law in Augusta. Thomas Jr. was the son of Brigadier General Thomas Glascock Sr. who rescued Count Pulaski from the Siege of Savannah. (Submitted on November 12, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Thomas Glascock - Find-a-grave. Brigadier General, US Congressman. Member of the Georgia State House of Representatives 1821, 1823, 1831, 1834, and 1839, serving as speaker in 1833 and 1834. He was elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-fourth US Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John W.A. Sanford. Later, re-elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-fifth US Congress and served from October 5, 1835, to March 3, 1839. (Submitted on November 12, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, May 20, 2012
4. Glascock County Marker
Marker is in front of the Glascock Co. courthouse.
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 26, 2015
5. Glascock County Marker
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 26, 2015
6. Glascock County Marker
Thomas Glascock (1790-1841) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
7. Thomas Glascock (1790-1841)
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, May 20, 2012
8. Glascock County Marker
Memorial on the courthouse lawn that honors those of Glascock County who served their country in time of war.
Glascock County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber, May 20, 2012
9. Glascock County Marker
A plaque in front of the courthouse steps.
Sheriff James L. English Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Judith Barber
10. Sheriff James L. English Memorial
The citizens of Glascock County with prided have erected this monument in honor of an outstanding human being and the epitome of a professional peace officer. James L English, Sheriff 1957 – 1997 For his untiring efforts, loyalty and dedication to mankind
Original Glascock County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 2, 2012
11. Original Glascock County Courthouse
The original courthouse, a two story frame building, was erected in 1858. When the current courthouse was built in 1918, the old building was sold and moved two blocks west, where it was remodeled as a private residence. This is the west side of the house (right side from the street), the original front of the courthouse. The location of the original front door is obvious when the image is enlarged.
Original Glascock County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 2, 2012
12. Original Glascock County Courthouse
The rear of the original courthouse, now the left side of the house (facing the house from the street).
Original Glascock County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 2, 2012
13. Original Glascock County Courthouse
The original courthouse from the street, hidden by a very old and extremely large Magnolia tree.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia. This page has been viewed 571 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Judith Barber of Marietta, Georgia.   11, 12, 13. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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