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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Army of the Potomac

Major Gen. George B. McClellan, Commanding

 

—September 15, 1862 —

 
Army of the Potomac Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
1. Army of the Potomac Marker
Inscription.
On the morning of September 15, 1862, the Army of the Potomac pursued the retreating Confederates from South Mountain: Pleasonton's cavalry, the Second, First, and Twelfth Corps by Turner's Pass, Boonsboro and Keedysville; Sykes' Division of the Fifth Corps, the Reserve Artillery and Ninth Corps by Fox's Pass and the Old Sharpsburg Road. The Sixth Corps and Couch's Division (attached to the Sixth Corps), remained near Crampton's Pass. Pleasonton overtook the Confederate Cavalry rear guard at Boonsboro, attacked and cut it off from the main body and pursued it in the direction of Hagerstown. Richardson's Division, Second Corps, in the advance, followed closely and skirmished with the retreating infantry, until it reached the ridge bordering the Antietam, behind which it formed line, north of the Boonsboro Pike. Tidball's Battery (A 2d U.S.) and Pettit's Battery (B 1st New York), from the crest of the ridge engaged the Confederate Artillery posted at and south of this point. French's and Sedgwick's Divisions, Second Corps, halted on either side of the pike, midway between Keedysville and the Antietam. The First Corps took position east of the Upper Bridge; the Twelfth Corps halted near Keedysville. Sykes' Division formed south of the Boonsboro Pike, on Richardson's left. Late in the day the Ninth Corps encamped on Geeting's farm at
Army of the Potomac Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Army of the Potomac Marker
the west base of Elk Ridge. Army Headquarters were established at the Pry House.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 118.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.176′ N, 77° 44.182′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Richardson Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Located at a tablet cluster near the Sunken Road next to the observation tower, stop eight on the driving tour of Antietam. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. September 16, 1862 (here, next to this marker); September 17, 1862 (here, next to this marker); September 17, 1862 (Continued) (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named September 17, 1862 (Continued) (a few steps from this marker); Army of Northern Virginia (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Army of Northern Virginia (a few steps from this marker); a different marker
Tablet Cluster next to the Observation Tower image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 5, 2007
3. Tablet Cluster next to the Observation Tower
also named Army of Northern Virginia (a few steps from this marker); Hexamer's (New Jersey) Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); Major General Israel B. Richardson (within shouting distance of this marker); Irish Brigade (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
More about this marker. One of five tablets erected at this location to describe the activities of the Army of the Potomac from September 15-17, 1862.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Listing of the Battle Overview Tablets and Headquarters Monuments.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on February 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. The Army of the Potomac. Order of battle for the Army as it entered action at Antietam. (Submitted on February 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Army of the Potomac Marker<br>First From the Left image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Army of the Potomac Marker
First From the Left
Gen. George B. McClellan (1826-1855) image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady, LOC, 1861
5. Gen. George B. McClellan (1826-1855)
Despite significant advantages in manpower, McClellan was unable to concentrate his forces effectively, which meant that Lee was able to shift his defenders to parry each of three Union thrusts, launched separately and sequentially against the Confederate left, center, and finally the right. And McClellan was unwilling to employ his ample reserve forces to capitalize on localized successes.
The Pry House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 17, 2007
6. The Pry House
The Pry House became McClellan's Headquarters and a field hospital during the battle. The house is east of the main battlefield area, off Boonsboro Pike (MD 34).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 839 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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